© 2022 South Carolina Public Radio
Radio Website Header-Waves 6 3.0.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

American Revolution-SC

  • America’s independence was secured in South Carolina, across its swamps, fields, woods and mountains. These events of 1779-1782 directly led to victory in the Revolutionary War.The Liberty Trail – developed through a partnership between the American Battlefield Trust and the South Carolina Battleground Trust – connects battlefields across South Carolina and tells the stories of this transformative chapter of American history.On this week’s episode of Walter Edgar’s Journal Dr. Edgar talks with Doug Bostick, Exec. Dir and CEO of the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, and Catherine Noyes, Liberty Trail Program Director for the American Battlefield Trust, about their vision for The Liberty Trail: to permanently protect more than 2,500 acres of battlefield land and ultimately link nearly 80 sites.
  • America’s independence was secured in South Carolina, across its swamps, fields, woods and mountains. These events of 1779-1782 directly led to victory in the Revolutionary War.The Liberty Trail – developed through a partnership between the American Battlefield Trust and the South Carolina Battleground Trust – connects battlefields across South Carolina and tells the stories of this transformative chapter of American history.On this week’s episode of Walter Edgar’s Journal Dr. Edgar talks with Doug Bostick, Exec. Dir and CEO of the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, and Catherine Noyes, Liberty Trail Program Director for the American Battlefield Trust, about their vision for The Liberty Trail: to permanently protect more than 2,500 acres of battlefield land and ultimately link nearly 80 sites.
  • “In the most barren inhospitable unhealthy part of North America, opposed by the most savage, inveterate perfidious cruel Enemy, with zeal and with Bayonets only, it was resolv’d to follow Green’s Army, to the end of the World.” So wrote British general Charles O’Hara about the epic confrontation between Nathanael Greene and Charles Cornwallis during the winter of 1780-81. Only Greene’s starving, threadbare Continentals stood between Cornwallis and control of the South—and a possible end to the American rebellion.This week on Walter Edgar's Journal, author Andrew Waters talks with Walter Edgar about a compelling chapter of the American Revolution. Waters is author of the book, To the End of the World: Nathanael Greene, Charles Cornwallis, and the Race to the Dan (2021, Westholme).
  • “W” is for Waxhaws, the Battle of (May 29, 1780). The Battle of the Waxhaws, also known as Buford’s Massacre, was one of the several incidents in the backcountry that helped turn the Revolutionary War in the South into a bloody civil war.
  • “W” is for Waxhaws, the Battle of (May 29, 1780). The Battle of the Waxhaws, also known as Buford’s Massacre, was one of the several incidents in the backcountry that helped turn the Revolutionary War in the South into a bloody civil war.
  • “S” is for St. Peter’s Parish. In 1747 the Commons House of Assembly established St. Peter’s Parish, bounded on the west by the Savanna River and on the east by the New River.
  • “S” is for St. Peter’s Parish. In 1747 the Commons House of Assembly established St. Peter’s Parish, bounded on the west by the Savanna River and on the east by the New River.
  • “J” is for Jeremiah, Thomas (d. 1775). Free black harbor pilot, alleged insurrectionary.
  • “G” is for Geiger, Emily (ca. 1762). Revolutionary War heroine.
  • “G” is for Geiger, Emily (ca. 1762). Revolutionary War heroine.