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WWII-SC

  • A veterans group is trying to raise millions of dollars to build a museum in South Carolina honoring a group of 80 men who went on a daring bombing raid over Tokyo. The Doolittle Raiders started their training in Columbia for the attack that took place just months after the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor brought the U.S. into World War II. The American Heritage Foundation wants to build a museum to honor the raiders near the Columbia Metropolitan Airport. The group owns property near the airport it would like to use for the building, perhaps displaying restored B-52 bombers like the Doolittle Raiders flew. An architect is already working with a planning group.
  • The Doolittle Raid was America's first strike back at Japan after the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, and it had its beginnings in Columbia, South Carolina.
  • Nearly eight decades have passed since William Linder, known to loved ones as “Bud,” was killed in one of the longest and most costly battles of World War II. For years, his remains were buried in a cemetery in Belgium — an unknown soldier. But on Oct. 29, the Army staff sergeant from Piedmont, born 107 years prior, reached his final resting place back home in Anderson County with all the pomp and circumstance of a fallen war hero returning home.
  • In celebration of Walter Edgar’s Journal at 21, this week's episode is an encore from 2012, featuring the late T. Moffatt Burriss. Burriss was a former Columbia area contractor, Republican state lawmaker and American World War II battlefield hero.An Anderson native, Burris was a concentration camp liberator who also participated in the invasions of Sicily and Italy. During Operation Market Garden in Holland, he led the amphibious assault across the Waal River made famous in the movie, A Bridge Too Far. Burriss is the subject of an ETV special Man and Moment: T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing. He joined Walter Edgar, former State newspaper reporter Jeff Wilkinson, and documentary producer Lee Ann Kornegay, to talk about the war and about making the film.
  • In celebration of Walter Edgar’s Journal at 21, this week's episode is an encore from 2012, featuring the late T. Moffatt Burriss. Burriss was a former Columbia area contractor, Republican state lawmaker and American World War II battlefield hero.An Anderson native, Burris was a concentration camp liberator who also participated in the invasions of Sicily and Italy. During Operation Market Garden in Holland, he led the amphibious assault across the Waal River made famous in the movie, A Bridge Too Far. Burriss is the subject of an ETV special Man and Moment: T. Moffatt Burriss and the Crossing. He joined Walter Edgar, former State newspaper reporter Jeff Wilkinson, and documentary producer Lee Ann Kornegay, to talk about the war and about making the film.
  • 75 years ago - June 6, 1944 - 156,000 Allied troops on nearly 7000 ships and landing craft and supported by 11,590 planes dropping both bombs and…
  • This week's program is an encore of an episode aired in 2012, featuring T. Moffatt Burriss. Burriss was a former Columbia area contractor, Republican…
  • 76 years ago (April 18 1942) 80 brave men did what had never been attempted: they flew army bombers off a U.S. aircraft carrier on their way to bomb…
  • "W" is for World War II (1941-1945). Prior to the entry of the US into World War II, the federal government constructed or expanded military…
  • Since 1980, the University of South Carolina has built a national reputation as one of the top film preservation archives in the nation. Its Moving Image…