Civil War

Charleston, South Carolina, 1865. Broad street, looking east with the ruins of Cathedral of St. John and St. Finbar.
Library of Congress; photographer unknown

South Carolina in the Civil War and Reconstruction Eras (USC Press, 2016) is an anthology of the most enduring and important scholarly articles about the Civil War and Reconstruction era published in the peer-reviewed journal Proceedings of the South Carolina Historical Association.

Dr. J. Brent Morris
USC Beaufort

In this final installment of public Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Brent Morris, associate professor of history and chair of the humanities at the University of South Carolina-Beaufort, talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the unification of the slave state in South Carolina from 1783 to 1828.

All Stations: Fri, Mar 10, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Mar 12, 4 pm

Dr. Lacy Ford
University of South Carolina

Join us for the third public conversation in a four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828. Dr. Lacy Ford, Dean, College of Arts & Sciences University of South Carolina and author of Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 and Deliver Us from Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South, will discuss the ideology and public policy of slavery in the American republic.

For the second lecture in this four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Larry Watson discusses slavery in South Carolina. Professor Watson is Associate Professor of History & Adjunct Professor of History South Carolina State University and the University of South Carolina. He is author of numerous articles on African American life in the American South.

This series of public conversations is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Southern Studies Institute at the University of South Carolina.

Peter Coclanis
University of North Carolina

Dr. Peter Coclanis, the Albert Ray Newsome Distinguished Professor & Director of the Global Research Institute at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, joins Dr. Edgar for the first of a series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828. Professor Coclanis, author of The Shadow of a Dream: Economic Life and Death in the South Carolina Low Country, 1670-1920, will discuss the importance of cotton to the state's economy.

Early American Flag
iStock

(Originally broadcast 04/08/16) -  Doug Bostick, of the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, and Jim Lighthizer, President of the Civil War Trust, talk with Walter Edgar about their ongoing efforts to preserve important Revolutionary War sites in South Carolina. The trusts are currently working to obtain and preserve key portions of sites for the battles of the Battle of Hanging Rock and the Battle of the Waxhaws.

Dr. William J. Cooper, Jr.
Louisiana State University

  (Originally broadcast 02/07/15) -In an encore from the 2015 series, Conversations on the Civil War, sponsored by the University of South Carolina’s College of Arts and Humanities, William Cooper talks with Walter Edgar about the life of Jefferson Davis, an American soldier and politician who became president of the Confederate States of America. 

  "L" is for Longstreet, James Peter [1821-1904]. Soldier. Born in Edgefield District, Longstreet spent his formative years in Georgia and Alabama. After graduating from West Point, he had a successful army career, serving with distinction in the Mexican war and achieving the rank of major. In 1861, he resigned his US Army commission and joined the Confederate Army as a brigadier general. He distinguished himself as a superb military tactician and in 1862 Robert E. Lee made him his second in command.

Gettysburg

Jun 27, 2016
Dr. Mark M. Smith
University of South Carolina

  (Originally broadcast 07/05/13) - Dr. Mark Smith, Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, takes part in this discussion of the battle of Gettysburg, which marked the beginning of the end of the Confederate States’ rebellion in the American Civil War.

Charleston, South Carolina, 1865. Broad street, looking east with the ruins of Cathedral of St. John and St. Finbar.
Library of Congress; photographer unknown

  (Originally broadcast 01/15/16) - National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis called the Reconstruction Era an “often-ignored or misunderstood period in our rich history” but one that bridges the nation’s Civil War and its civil rights movement. Now, the Park Service has begun chronicling the historic sites in South Carolina that tell the Reconstruction story.

Dr. John Marzsalek
Mississippi State University

  In his book, Sherman: A Soldier’s Passion for Order (Free Press, 1992) John F. Marszalek presents general William Tecumseh Sherman as a complicated man who, fearing anarchy, searched for the order that he hoped would make his life a success. Dr. Marszalek talks with Walter Edgar about Sherman as a military commander who came to abhor what he saw as the senseless slaughter of the War, and who sought a different strategy to bring the South to surrender. (Originally broadcast 04/10/15)

---All Stations: Fri, Aug 28, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Aug 30, 4 pm---

  (Originally broadcast 03/20/15) --- In a remarkable reappraisal of Lincoln, the distinguished historian O. Vernon Burton shows how the president’s authentic Southernness empowered him to conduct a civil war that redefined freedom as a personal right to be expanded to all Americans. In the violent decades to follow, the extent of that freedom would be contested but not its central place in what defined the country.

This conversation was recorded before a live audience as part of the series Conversations on the Civil War, sponsored by the University of South Carolina’s College of Arts and Humanities and Institute for Southern Studies.

--- All Stations: Fri, Aug 21, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Aug 23, 4 pm ---


  “C” is for Civil War [1861-1865]. Even before the state had seceded in December 1860, South Carolina had already begun making preparations for a war that most of her citizens believed either would never actually occur or would be of short duration. On April 2, 1861, Confederate gunners began to fire on Fort Sumter. Over the course of the next four years, more than 60,000 South Carolinians either volunteered or were drafted into military service. The Palmetto State was not a major battleground, but it did see a few major campaigns and several minor engagements. One result of the Union victory was the emancipation of 400,000 slaves. A painful consequence of the Civil War was 18,000 to 21,000 men—or one of every fourteen white South Carolinians had been killed or had died from disease while in uniform.


“C” is for The Citadel

Jul 7, 2015

  “C” is for The Citadel. The Citadel originated in 1822 as an arsenal and guardhouse to defend white Charlestonians from possible slave uprisings. In 1842, the General Assembly combined the State Citadel with the Arsenal in Columbia to create the South Carolina Military Academy. When South Carolina seceded from the Union in December 1860, Citadel cadets helped shore up the defenses around Charleston harbor. One month later they assembled on Morris Island and fired cannon shots at the Star of the West which was trying to resupply Federal troops at Fort Sumter. Citadel alumni claim that these were the first shots fired in the Civil War. From 1865 until 1879 Federal troops occupied the Citadel. In 1882, led by former Confederate general Johnson Hagood, the institution’s supporters persuaded the legislature to reopen The Citadel.


  “C” is for Chesnut, Mary Boykin Miller [1823-1886]. Diarist. Mary Chesnut began keeping a diary in February 1861 and later revised it for publication in the 1880s. Her husband’s prominent role in the new Confederacy carried her to the centers of action and allowed her to witness and record her impressions of those dramatic times. All the while she made her own perceptive observations of people and events, and the frustrations of a spirited woman in a world of men.

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