Clemson Univesity Extension Service

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I found a kindred spirit while reading up on golden rod. Althea Fann wrote a charming article, “Reflections of an Accidental Florist,” a College of Charleston. From her experience working for a Charleston florist, Fann delightfully recounts tales about brides and their insistence on having peonies and such out of season.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clumps of goldenrod are brightening our roadsides and gardens. Garden club ladies don’t want watery eyes or runny noses, so you can bet they did their homework before encouraging our General Assembly to name goldenrod as the state wildflower. Plants with showy colorful flowers are usually trying to attract insect pollinators to carry their relatively heavy pollen from one flower to the next, and that’s exactly what happens with goldenrod.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Although it doesn’t feel like fall, with temperatures in the 80’s and 90’s, many plants we associate with autumn, especially in the aster family, are coming into flower. The roads I travel from St. Matthews to Sumter are made beautiful now by drifts of goldenrod.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.

Rock Hill's Blackjacks Heritage Preserve provides a protected space for this rare sunflower among many other species.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. At Botany Bay Heritage Preserve, scientists using  LiDAR ,an aerial 3D laser scanning method, have discovered the oldest shell ring in our State, Pokoy 1, dating to 4300 years ago, the same period as the earliest Egyptian pyramids. This oyster shell structure was constructed and only used for a relatively short period of time – from 20 to one hundred years.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. If it's safe to turn around, when I see a turtle crossing the road, I try to get it across.   My rescues are mostly box turtles. But we have two Department of Natural Resources Heritage Trust sites dedicated to protect the endangered gopher tortoise populations.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The Heritage Trust Program, a division of the Department of Natural Resources, maintains, administers sites with cultural or ecosystem importance. As part of the culturally significant duties, a team of archaeologist works on those specific sites. They also train teachers in free workshops – two upcoming ones in Columbia, concern shelter and nutrition.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. South Carolina’s Heritage Trust Program has protected over 95,000 acres of land selected for unique ecological features or important cultural significance. Most are open to the public and some allow hunting and fishing. The goal is to protect and share with citizens and visitors to our state the incredible diversity we have in South Carolina.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. One of the remarkable features of our state is the incredible diversity that comes from our encompassing mountains, foothills, piedmont, sandhills and coastal plains ecosystems.

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty talks with the Historic Columbia’s Director of Grounds Keith Mearns about their new on-line plant database that documents all of their plant material.

Dr. John Nelson of the AC Moore Herbarium joins Clemson Extension Agent and host of Making It Grow, Amanda McNulty , for a final chat on Carolina Bays.

Dr. John Nelson of the AC Moore Herbarium joins Clemson Extension Agent and host of Making It Grow, Amanda McNulty, to continue the conversation about Carolina Bays.

Dr. John Nelson of the AC Moore Herbarium joins Clemson Extension Agent and the host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty, to talk about Carolina Bays.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The Schweinitz sunflower was named for Lewis David de Scweinitz, an American botanist with important German connections. Born in Pennsylvania, he was a descendant of the founder of the Moravian Church, and traveled to Germany for training at a seminary there. .

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Tom Ballou of the Midlands Chapter of the South Carolina Bee Keepers Association first told me about Schweinitiz’ sunflower, Helianthus Schweinitizii, several years ago and gave me a start for my garden. Sadly, a huge pine fell into that space after a hurricane and it was two years before I could get it removed and find out what plants survived.

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