Colonial America

St Nicholas Abbey, Saint Peter, Barbados
Pontificalibus [CC BY-SA 3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

It is hard to imagine what South Carolina would be today if not for the then-British colony of Barbados. From the settlement of this West Indian island in 1627 to the time of Carolina's settlement in 1670, Barbados changed from an uninhabited island to a Colony where land owners created small plantations using indentured laborers in the quest to find the most profitable cash crop and then to a mostly-clear-cut land that was planted with sugar cane, almost to the ocean's edge.

A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893 to 2006
University of South Carolina Press

(Originally broadcast 12/09/16) - In the third volume of the history of Beaufort County, Lawrence S. Rowland and Stephen R. Wise conclude their five hundred–year chronicle of the legendary South Carolina Sea Islands. A History of Beaufort County - Bridging the Sea Islands' Past and Present, 1893–2006 (2016, USC Press) begins with the devastating Sea Island Hurricane of 1893, one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

“Join or Die,” by Benjamin Franklin, Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia, PA), May 9, 1754.
Library of Congress

  (Originally broadcast 02/19/16) - ​In his book, Carolina in Crisis: Cherokees, Colonists, and Slaves in the American Southeast, 1756 - 1763, (2015, UNC Press) Dr. Daniel J. Tortora, assistant professor of history at Colby College, explores how the Anglo-Cherokee War reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the colonial South.