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Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty talks Clemson University Associate Professor Dr. Jim Faust about floriculture and other research projects he is working on in the Clemson Greenhouses.

Ogeechee Lime

Feb 8, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  Although the AC Moore Herbarium list of South Carolina’s plant distribution shows Ogeechee lime, Nyssa ogeche, as documented in only Jasper and Beaufort counties, there is a specimen growing at Moore Farms Botanical Garden in Lake City.  It’s obviously a female tree, which has mostly female flowers but also some perfect ones, as it produces fruits.

Honeydew Honey

Feb 7, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  If you like the pine resin flavored Greek wine retsina, I have a honey suggestion for you. At Honey Travelers Single Flower honey page, they talk about forest or honeydew honey. Honeydew is the substance that aphids excrete – it is the bane of many gardeners as it coats the surface of lower leaves this sweet substance upon which sooty mold grows.

Honey Varietals

Feb 6, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I’m not very picky about honey although Maynard Door near Sumter gave me some special honey he didn’t mix in with others  as its flavor was so delightfully floral. Lots of people are honey aficionados and have their favorites for different purposes. There are even listings for honey varietals, just like wine! For example, the website Honey Travelers has information on a honey competition in the Mediterranean region.

Ogeechee Honey

Feb 5, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. If you look at the USC Herbarium’s plant distribution list, you’ll see that only in Jasper and Beaufort Counties has Ogeechee lime, Nyssa ogeche, been documented. It’s greatest distribution is in a swath of Georgia and the upper panhandle of Florida. Bee keepers take hives into these sites,  sometimes floating them on platforms, to produce this very valuable white ogeechee honey.

Nyssa Ogeche

Feb 3, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The rarest of the North American Nyssa trees is Nyssa ogeche. The species name comes from the Ogeechee River in Georgia, a blackwater river, like our Edisto River in South Carolina. It, too has beautiful bald cypress trees growing in it. But In its massive drainage basin, you’ll also find this Nyssa species, with the common name Ogeechee lime, which only grows in four states.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Nyssa sylvatica has two varieties. On drier sites, you’ll find Nyssa sylvatica var sylvatica. In wet areas, often growing with bald cypress, the variety biflora is found. Both exhibit beautiful fall color, have small flowers very important to pollinators and produce fruits relished by birds and certain mammals. Also, their leaves are browsed by certain animals.

Hollow Trees

Jan 31, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Today we fret over hollow trees, although educational websites say that those trees can be almost as strong as a tree still filled with heartwood. Trees near trafficked areas or buildings should be evaluated by an arborist. But for wildlife, hollows serve as homes for bats, birds, mammals, and reptiles. We’ve been talking about early farmers used sections of blackgum tree hollows to make bee hives.

More Blackgum Tales

Jan 30, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I’m still excited about George Ellison’s column in the Asheville Citizen Times “Why the blackgum has a hollow trunk” -- do look it up --as it paints a wonderful picture of how something that sounds bad – a rotten tree – was critically important in frontier life.

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. George Ellison in his column “Why the blackgum tree has a hollow trunk," Asheville Citizen Times, lists how people used these pipe-like tree parts after heart rot fungus had rendered them hollow.

Nyssa Sylvatica

Jan 27, 2020

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Certain trees in the genus Nyssa are most often associated with wet areas, the generic name honors the Greek water nymph Nyssa. All their flowers, both male and female, are very attractive to bees. I found an article in the Asheville Citizens Times about one type, Nyssa sylvatica  var.

Demanding Chicken

Dec 7, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Fontella Bass, our half-tamed chicken who sleeps in the dining room in a dog crate for safety is remarkably and somewhat irritatingly demanding. She makes a racket in the morning when she hears me come downstairs until I take her out on the back porch, open the crate door, and put food out for her. In the summer, she kept me from sleeping late as I could hear her clucking and I felt guilty about making her stay in her crate after the sun was up.

One Bossy Chicken

Dec 6, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I talked earlier about our much missed neighbors who had live-wire boys, the world’s best dog, and short-lived chickens with one exception, Fontella Bass who had been rescued from the jaws of death on numerous occasions, she’s named for the woman who recorded the song Rescue Me.   When her former owners moved, they decided to leave her in her by-then completely free-range state.

A Great Pet

Dec 5, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Our pet hen, Chickie Wimberly, was quite the enforcer. We had a half lab half bassett hound dog, Sally, take up with us who was a pain about getting under foot when we sat on the front porch; often to steal and hors d’oeuvre or, once, a piece of fried chicken out of daughter Lill’s hand. But Chickie Wimberly occasionally came through on patrol and she ran Sally off like nobody’s business.

Pet Chicken

Dec 4, 2019

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. We had a pet chicken years ago, first named Poinsett Cucumber as my son brought her home from school  in a box with that name on it. His teacher had incubated eggs and as she was a cousin, she felt like she could send a biddy home without asking! The hen-to-be,  renamed Chickie Wimberly, went everywhere with us. A note here – one small chicken does not make much mess.

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