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Pres. Trump To Announce His Supreme Court Nominee

16 hours ago
Graphic of the Whitehouse
Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Saturday, September 26, at 5:00 p.m. President Trump will announce his nominee to replace Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Sept. 18. Watch the announcement live, here...

File photo of the S.C. House chamber
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

Last Year's Operating Budget to Remain In Effect

It now appears that South Carolina’s state government will operate for the first half of its’ current fiscal year using last year’s budget.  A lack of action by the General Assembly this week left last year’s budget in place as lawmakers face continued uncertainty about the state’s economy.

USC Library Acquires Major Comic Book Collection

Sep 25, 2020
A prestigious collection of more than 180,000 historic comic books, pulp magazines and other items has been acquired by the University of South Carolina's Thomas Cooper Library.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Superman, Batman, Donald Duck, Tarzan of the Apes and many more characters that help define American popular culture have been seen in comic books and other media for many years.  The adventures of hundreds of such characters are now gathered in one place at the University of South Carolina's Thomas Cooper Library, thanks to the gift of a major collection of more than 180,000 comics, pulp magazines and related items from an Ohio collector.  

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Isn’t it interesting how differently the following two phrases sound:

  • A little house in the country.
  • Affordable rural housing.

They’re the same thing, really. But perceptions about life in the country depend almost entirely on whether someone with choices opts to buy a house there or someone without choices tries to buy in.

File photo of the U.S. Supreme Court building
Liam James Doyle/NPR

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being remembered in a private ceremony at the high court, where her body is lying in repose. Watch the ceremony here, 9:30 - 11:00 a.m.

www.lwv.org

In February of 1920, just six months before the 19th amendment was ratified, the League of Women Voters was founded by Suffragists of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Chicago, Illinios. The nonpartisan organization has been referred to as a "mighty political experiment," designed to help 20 million women carry out their new responsibilities as voters.

Shortage of Coins Brought On by COVID Pandemic

Sep 15, 2020
COVID-19 has had many affects on society, some unexpected.  One of these is a shortage of coins.
gaustin11 via Pixabay

COVID-19 has caused many disruptions in people's daily lives, and one of the unexpected obstacles facing businesses around the state and country - as if there weren't enough - is a shortage of coins.

Army Identifies Soldier Found Dead at Fort Jackson

Sep 14, 2020

Sunday, Army officials identified the basic combat training soldier who was found dead in his barracks at Fort Jackson on September 12.

29-year old Pvt. Michael Wise from Wisconsin was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment.

Saturday, officials announced a 48-hour training stand down.

"This is a difficult time for everyone who knew Michael and we continue to provide comfort to his teammates," said Fort Jackson Commander Brig. Gen. Milford H. Beagle, Jr. "Chaplains and other medical professionals are helping those in need."

File photo of the S.C. Senate in session
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

The state legislature will return to Columbia next week to once again consider what to do about next year’s operating budget.  Uncertainty about the economy and how much state tax revenue it will generate has lawmakers in a quandary.

Florence Senator Hugh Leatherman, the veteran chairman of the powerful Senate Finance committee said this week that when it comes to the economic uncertainty being caused by the pandemic it’s the most uncertain of times he has ever seen.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

The mental health crisis among healthcare workers in the pandemic is, in large part, one of moral crisis.  

We’ve reported on the emotional toll COVID-19 can take on frontline healthcare workers. But what about the toll it’s taking on professionals at the further reaches of the healthcare continuum?

Feliphe Schiarolli / Unsplash

One of the upsides to having children back in a physical classroom is that the state's child protective services workers can talk to kids again. A lot of them are dealing with abuse or neglect and it's easier to catch up with several of them when they're in one place, away from the people abusing and neglecting them.

Numerous pharmaceutical manufacturers are working hard to develop a vaccine for COVID-19.  Once that's done, the big question to be answered is, will people take it?
Arek Socha via Pixabay

Drug companies have been working furiously to produce a vaccine for COVID-19, with hopes for one late this year or early 2021.  As development gets nearer, an important question has arisen among some medical professionals:  once the vaccine has been produced, will people trust it enough to take it?

Special Coverage: President Trump Visits Kenosha

Sep 1, 2020

President Trump is visiting Kenosha, Wis., the site of racial unrest after police shot Jacob Blake, a Black man, leaving him paralyzed. Watch his remarks, live, at 2:00 p.m.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

One could make much of the timing of Chef Rob Masone’s next big food venture, seeing that it just happens to intersect with a moment that’s brought us both a pandemic and a major conversation about the meaning and breadth of race and racism in the United States.

Christensen family Portrait, Abbie 3rd from right
The Christensen family

Anne Christensen Pollitzer lives at the end of a dirt road on Saint Helena Island.  The view from her back porch is as stunning as her story.

White egrets wade along the marsh as Anne unfolds two large, cardboard displays beside her, spreading them out like wings.  Each is filled with old photographs.

The retired schoolteacher is prepared to talk about her great-great grandmother Abbie Holmes Christensen, a celebrated suffragist, folklorist and educator.

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