No-Till Farming

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

In a chilly December sunset at Wild Hope Farm, the chickens are nice and warm, bobbing around inside an enclosed pen while a pair of China geese float in a small pond just outside. Stretching out to their right are long strips of green cover cops and similarly long strips of garlic.

It might not look it to the casual eye, but these birds and plants are all here to do a job, and an elegantly coordinated one at that. The geese chase away the hawks that prey on the chickens that eat the cover crops that draw greenhouse gases from the air. The garlic does that too, except it will end up in people bellies later this year, and not chicken bellies.

No Till Farming

Oct 13, 2014

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow! Recently, over 100 people attended a field day at the farm of Jason Carter in Eastover. Jason is converting from strip-till to no-till. He is drastically reducing his use of pesticides and synthetic fertilizer and yet his yields are envious. How’s he doing it – through cover crops! He is getting nitrogen from chicken litter applications and from the breakdown of legume cover crops – the ones that can fix nitrogen through a symbiotic relationship with soil organisms.