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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

In late March, Jim Murren, the head of Nevada’s coronavirus task force, was on a conference call that made one thing clear: Las Vegas was not ready to reopen.

During the Cold War, the United States took hundreds of thousands of surveillance images of the Soviet Union using spy satellites.

The project was called — in an odd historical twist — “CORONA.”

Developed in the 1950s and used throughout the 1970s, CORONA surveillance was used to look for nuclear weapons. 

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Along the Amazon River, people have long moved freely among the small towns that sit where the borders of Brazil, Colombia and Peru converge — walking and driving between countries, or rafting from one shore to another. 

Coronavirus exposes Sudan's broken health care system

May 29, 2020

Earlier this week, senior members of former Sudan President Omar al-Bashir’s regime were reportedly diagnosed with the coronavirus and transferred from the notorious Kober prison to a hospital in Sudan’s capital city of Khartoum.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Demonstrators outraged over police brutality in the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, took to the streets in Minneapolis for the third straight night, as Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz called in the National Guard after fires and vandalism erupted during protests. 

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

China's parliament voted to move forward with a controversial security law that would make it a crime to undermine Beijing's authority in Hong Kong. Bypassing Hong Kong's legislative process, the law would effectively alter the territory's mini-constitution, which gives it semi-autonomy.

Editor's note 5/27/20: A previous version of this story displayed images of an asylum seeker. They have been removed for the asylum seeker's protection.

At the airport in the Russian Arctic city of Murmansk, passengers file out from the morning flight from Moscow — many seemingly dazed by the surroundings and clearly underdressed for the coming polar winter.

“We are all from hell,” says a passenger named Tomasi, an Iranian from Tehran, when asked where he and others had arrived from.

Syria’s first family is caught in a feud

May 27, 2020

The inner workings of the powerful Assad family have remained under close wraps in the past five decades or so since Hafez al-Assad took control of Syria in a coup.

On the surface, all seemed fine between the ruling elites.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

The key to winning the Latino vote in 2020? Latinas.

May 25, 2020

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Women vote at higher rates than men across all racial and ethnic groups in the US. That gap is particularly wide for Latino voters. 

South Korea limited the spread of the coronavirus through aggressive contact tracing that relies heavily on data collection. But following a recent outbreak, many in the country’s LGBTQ community feel they’re being singled out.

South Korean health officials gain access to the cellphone GPS records, credit card transactions and transportation history of anyone who tests positive for COVID-19, and then they release much of that information to the public. Text message alerts urge everyone who might have crossed paths with the patient to immediately get tested.

Is it curtains for London's West End?

May 20, 2020

Theater producer Nica Burns remembers precisely where she was when word filtered through that all theaters across London would have to close — she was backstage with the cast of her new show, "City of Angels." 

One of the world's richest nations, Saudi Arabia, is calling for shared economic sacrifice.

The announcement came earlier this month when the Saudi finance minister, Mohammed al-Jadaan, went on state media.

He told the nation that starting July 1, they will have to pay a 15% tax on all goods and services in the kingdom.

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