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One week before George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis, a young black man was fatally assaulted by police outside his home in a small town in southwestern Colombia.

Anderson Arboleda, 19, was chased by two police officers for breaking the pandemic curfew in the town of Puerto Tejada on May 20, his mother Claudia Ximena Arboleda said. When the officers caught up to him, they beat him over the head with batons and doused him in pepper spray. He died the next morning in a local hospital. 

Four years ago, JC, a teacher and poet from Mississippi, moved to China with her husband and two children on a grand adventure. Now, she teaches literature to high schoolers in Guangzhou.    

“It was going to be an opportunity for us to, I mean, essentially experience the American dream that's easier to find in other places than it is in America,” JC said.

Related: A massive Asian drug bust has stirred a fentanyl mystery

Trump proposes harsh asylum rules disqualifying many applicants

Jun 11, 2020

On Thursday, the Trump administration issued a proposal that would dramatically reshape the asylum system in the United States.

The proposal includes a number of changes that would make it more difficult for applicants to gain asylum in the US — including changing which applicants would get asylum hearings in the first place. 

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned of dire economic consequences of the novel coronavirus Wednesday — the pandemic looks to cause the worst recession in a century, outside of wartime.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Calls for racial justice in the US are compelling some South Koreans to point out xenophobia in their own country and reexamine decades-old tensions between black and Korean communities.

On Saturday, around 100 demonstrators walked through downtown Seoul in protest of the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in what was perhaps the first public showing of solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement in the nation.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

As protests reverberate around the world over the police killing of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis, Minnesota, some governments have urged would-be protesters to move their activism out of the streets over fears of the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The United Nations has called the situation in Yemen the worst humanitarian crisis on earth. It’s the product of a five-year war, food shortages, widespread poverty and homelessness. And now, Yemen faces the coronavirus pandemic.  

Protests around the world are highlighting the way racism impacts every aspect of society. That includes health.

In Washington, DC, on Thursday, a congressional subcommittee met to examine the racial health inequalities around the spread of COVID-19.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

During the worldwide COVID-19 lockdown, activists in some countries made historic gains in the fight to stop the practice of female genital mutilation, or FGM, which involves removing a girl’s clitoris. 

FGM is condemned by the World Health Organization as a violation of the human rights of girls and women. An estimated 200 million girls and women worldwide have undergone FGM, which is practiced in at least 27 African countries and parts of Asia and the Middle East.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond. 

Adela Diaz returned to campus at the University of Arizona in Tucson from spring break in early March to find that the world had shifted. 

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