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FEMA Disaster Assistance Interview
FEMA

  The United Way maintains a one-stop phone number, 211, to help flood survivors who still have unmet needs to connect with a list of local volunteer organizations. As FEMA disaster recovery centers have closed, the local groups remain to permanently help people with relief from any emergency.

  The three remaining disaster recovery centers in South Carolina will close Friday, Jan. 29, at 6 p.m.:

  • Richland County Library Southeast, 7421 Garners Ferry Road, Columbia
  • Williamsburg Recreation Center, 2084 Thurgood Marshall Highway, Kingstree
  • Central Carolina Technical College, 853 Broad St., Sumter

Many services available at disaster recovery centers are also available by calling the FEMA helpline. 

  Paleontologist Dave Cicimurri digs up fossils 34.5 million years old, not in some wilderness spot, but almost in downtown Aiken. The ancient sharks, rays, barracudas and more tell him not only that the area was once the bottom of the ocean, but the very sediment they’re buried in contains information about the environment of past eras. This information, in turn, may point to where the environment is headed in the far-flung future.


Marjory Wentworth
Andrew Allen/marjorywentworth.net

  Not every state has a poet laureate, but Charleston’s Marjory Wentworth is South Carolina’s. She’s written numerous books and hundreds of poems, at various times humorous, romantic and serious. She serves not only as an advocate for the arts in the Palmetto State, but can occasionally speak for the state’s soul, as when she was called upon for a poem to mark the occasion of the slayings of the Emmanuel Nine. Her poem “Holy City” was not only featured on the front page of the Charleston Post and Courier, but the BBC recorded her reciting it, for inclusion in its covering of the story. That was a solemn occasion, but Wentworth also discusses the joy of writing, and why she can’t live without it.


The Georgetown County disaster recovery center in Georgetown County, Beck Recreation Center, 2030 West Church St., Georgetown, will close Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 6 p.m.

Many services available at disaster recovery centers are also available by calling the FEMA helpline. Survivors of Oct. 1-23 storms and flooding in Georgetown County can get help by calling 800-621-3362 or TTY 800-462-7585; those who use 711/VRS can call 800-621-3362. Lines are open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week until further notice.

Survivors can use the helpline to:

South Carolina Flood Coverage on NPR

Jan 25, 2016

  During the October Floods, South Carolina Public Radio reporters submitted 18 stories to NPR for broadcast nationwide. This reel contains 4 of the stories carried on NPR’s National Newscast.


  In the initial days of the October Floods, staff of South Carolina Public Radio staff worked around the clock to keep the transmitters on the air and to provide breaking news coverage with updates about the disaster. This reel contains just a few of the critical news stories provided by Anchor George Kearns during the flood and the days that followed.


    Many survivors of last month’s floods have gone through great emotional strain from dealing with the many aspects of trying to get their lives back in order. FEMA is offering counseling services at no cost to flood victims who feel overwhelmed, exhausted or unable to cope with the load. Recovery centers across the state have mental health professionals on hand or readily available to victims.

Find the closest disaster recovery center to you: (800) 621- 3362 or fema.gov/disaster-recovery-centers • Register to apply for assistance: DisasterAssistance.gov or call (800) 621-3362 • Disaster assistance for the deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired: (800) 462-7585 (TTY).  Those who use 711/VRS, call (800) 621-3362.   The toll-free telephone numbers will operate 7 .m. – 10 p.m. seven days a week until further notice.  Survivors may also choose to visit a disaster recover center.  


Winter Storm Advisory

Jan 23, 2016

 

   The National Weather Service has issued a winter weather storm and advisory, in effect for the Upstate and Northern Midlands in South Carolina. Motorists are advised to use extreme caution on all roadways. Watch for freezing rain, ice accumulations and slow moving SCDOT maintenance vehicles. If you are involved in an accident with no injuries, South Carolina law requires a motorist to move vehicles from the roadway to avoid blocking traffic. Update will be provided as conditions change.

Click this link for the latest update from the SCEMD about county and state office delays and closings.  

Governor Haley outlines her plans to improve public education, and fight domestic violence in her annual State of the State Address.

This week Russ McKinney looks at the Governor’s sixth State of the State report to the General Assembly.

  The disaster recovery center at Irmo Library, 6251 St. Andrews Road, Columbia, will close Friday, Jan. 22, at 6 p.m.             

Many services available at disaster recovery centers are also available by calling the FEMA helpline. Survivors of Oct. 1-23 storms and flooding in Lexington County can get help by calling 800-621-3362 or TTY 800-462-7585; those who use 711/VRS can call 800-621-3362. Lines are open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week until further notice.

In the wake of the historical flood, community outreach programs are helping families get back on their feet.  The Pine Glen subdivision was hit hard by rising rain water and residents are worried they may not be able to move back in.

University of SC students clean up flood debris from Gills Creek, the location of some of the Midlands' worst flooding.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Just because some of South Carolina’s flood-ravaged roads and bridges have been re-opened and repairs to homes and businesses are in progress does not mean that little remains to be done.  A group of University of South Carolina students tackled one unmet need at Columbia’s Gills Creek the weekend prior to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

USGS water level gauge at the Gills Creek in Columbia, SC.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Of the many agencies that rushed to help victims of October’s floods, one remains largely unknown.  It’s the U.S. Geological Survey, which maintains a network of satellite-connected guages to measure the elevation of rivers and creeks statewide.   This information and more is shared with numerous agencies, and is vital to the National Weather Service, which uses it to make accurate predictions and generate flood warnings and watches when needed. 

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