South Carolina

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"E" is for Edwards, William Augustus [1866-1939]. Architect. Edwards began his career in Virginia, but, moved back to South Carolina as a partner in the firm of Wilson and Edwards. Edwards was the lead partner in several other architectural firms in South Carolina and, after 1908, in Atlanta.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"D" is for DeKalb, Johann [1712-1780]. Soldier. Born in Bavaria, DeKalb rose to the rank of brigadier-general in the French Army and decided to seek his military fortune in America. He was contracted as a major-general in the Continental Army and, along with Lafayette, arrived off the coast South Carolina, near Georgetown, in 1777.

Daniel Schludi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 vaccine is here. But you might be confused about when you can get it or how.

So let’s break it down.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1932 as a wintering ground for migratory waterfowl. Located in Charleston County Cape Romain stretches 22 miles along the coast between Charleston and the Santee River delta. In its shallow bays, tides combine the life-giving nourishment of the oceans with the nutrient-laden freshwaters of rivers to create a rich, productive environment.

"B" is for Barnwell County [548 square miles; population 23,478]. Barnwell County originally encompassed 1,440 square miles but lost more than one-half its territory to the formation of several newer counties: Aiken, Allendale, and Bamberg. The county was named for Revolutionary War hero, John Barnwell. Traditionally an agricultural county, Barnwell is better known today for the political clout it enjoyed for much of the 20th century.

"A" is for All Saints Parish. King George III vetoed the 1767 act establishing All Saints Parish. Re-established in 1778, it  comprised the Waccamaw neck of Horry and Georgetown counties. With the tidal cultivation of rice culture in the mid-eighteenth century, the Waccamaw River—which had so long been a barrier to the development of the Neck—became its greatest asset. Plantations sprang up along its banks, and by 1810 slaves made up nearly 90 percent of the population.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

In a chilly December sunset at Wild Hope Farm, the chickens are nice and warm, bobbing around inside an enclosed pen while a pair of China geese float in a small pond just outside. Stretching out to their right are long strips of green cover cops and similarly long strips of garlic.

It might not look it to the casual eye, but these birds and plants are all here to do a job, and an elegantly coordinated one at that. The geese chase away the hawks that prey on the chickens that eat the cover crops that draw greenhouse gases from the air. The garlic does that too, except it will end up in people bellies later this year, and not chicken bellies.

SCDHEC

Death is not the end of things when it comes to COVID. Not for coroners, anyway.

“People hear ‘death’ and it carries the connotation that it’s over,” says Lancaster County Coroner Karla Deese. “There’s so much more that occurs.”

Most people likely haven’t thought about how COVID deaths have changed things for coroners. In Lancaster County, where the morgue’s capacity for storage is 12, deceased people are adding up.

"G" is for Grand Strand. South Carolina’s Grand Strand is an uninterrupted strip of sandy beaches that officially stretches along sixty miles of Horry and Georgetown Counties from the North Carolina border to Winyah Bay. Unofficially the Grand Strand has referred to the greater Myrtle Beach area since the early 1920s. The Grand Strand is an unbroken strip of municipalities and communities strung together along US Highway 17. The first visitors were middle class and blue-color families from the Carolinas, but today's vacationers come from all over.

"F" is for the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina [1669-1698]. Part Constitution and part promotional tract, the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina comprised a much-revised document that the Lords Proprietors created to govern their New World province. Among the guiding principles of the constitutions were that landownership was the bedrock of society and that Carolina’s government should avoid creating a "numerous democracy." The proprietors’ insistence on provisions for considerable religious liberty was innovative.

SCETV File Photo

If there's a silver lining to 2020, it's that having to adapt to a society of avatars has made businesses and organizatons a lot more creative in how they reach their audiences. That's as true for the Culture and History Museums of York County as it is for anyone.

The sites under the CHM umbrella (Historic Brattonsville, the Main Street Children's Museum, the McCelvey Center, and the Museum of York County) were used to having lots of kids playing with toy dinosaurs and lots of people getting together for exhibits and displays. Then they had to close for a pandemic and find a way to stay relevant, and not just while the pandemic raged but for when it's gone.

"D" is for Drayton, Percival [1812-1865]. Naval Officer. Born in Charleston, Drayton’s family moved to Philadelphia in the 1830s. At fifteen, he was appointed a midshipman in the US Navy. Eventually he commanded a variety of vessels, including the Mississippi, the navy’s third steam-powered warship. In 1861, he held the rank of commander. While many southern-born officers resigned their commissions, Drayton chose to remain with the Union. In October 1861 he commanded a ship in the Port Royal Expedition.

"C" is for Charleston Hospital Workers’ Strike [1969]. In Charleston in 1969, more than 400 African American hospital workers (mostly female) went on strike against the all-white administrations of the Medical College Hospital and Charleston County Hospital. The strike against the Medical College lasted one hundred days during the spring and summer; the one at Charleston County went on for an additional three weeks.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Opioid pain killers were sold to doctors as little raindrops of happiness that would end a patient’s agony without being addictive.

In reality, addiction to opium-based prescription drugs triggered what Dr. Greg Colbath, an orthopedic surgeon at Spartanburg Regional Medical Center, calls “the largest manmade scourge we’ve ever unleashed.”

"B" is for Bishopville

Dec 14, 2020

"B" is for Bishopville [Lee County; population 3,670]. Bishopville, the seat of Lee County, traces its origins to prehistoric days when two Indian trails crossed near the future site of the town. European settlement began in the late 18th century and, for a time was known as Singleton’s Cross Roads. In 1821 Dr. Jacques Bishop purchased property in the area and operated a general store—by the late 1830s the little settlement was called Bishopville. The town has also served as a business and cultural center throughout its existence.

Pages