South Carolina

"H" is for Hamburg

Mar 17, 2017

"H" is for Hamburg. Founded in 1821 and located on the Savannah River in what is now Aiken County, the town of Hamburg was one of antebellum South Carolina's primary interior market towns. The new town grew rapidly as merchants tapped the cotton trade of the upper Savannah River valley.

"G" is for Gallivants Ferry Stump Meeting. The Gallivants Ferry Stump Meeting, a Democratic Party tradition since the 1880s, originated during Wade Hampton's 1876 gubernatorial campaign. Starting in a place called the Thicket, they matured into a tradition under the guidance of the Holliday family. The "stump" referred to a time when politicians promoted their candidacy by allegedly giving speeches while standing on tree stumps to be seen and heard above the assembled throng.

"F" is for Farrow, Samuel [1759-1824]. Congressman, legislator, reformer. A Revolutionary War veteran, Farrow was elected lieutenant governor in 1810 and a member of Congress in 1812. In 1816 the residents of Spartanburg District elected him to the General Assembly where he pursued a goal of creating a state lunatic asylum.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly.
Peter Miller via Flickr

"E" is for the Eastern tiger swallowtail. State butterfly. In 1994, by act of the General Assembly, the tiger swallowtail became South Carolina's official butterfly. The legislature acted at the behest of the Garden Club of South Carolina which selected the butterfly because it can be seen in deciduous woods, along streams, rivers, and wooded swamps, and in towns and cities throughout South Carolina.

Beth Daniel, captain of the USA Solheim Cup Team, after announcement of Solheim Cup teams, which followed final round of the 2009 Ricoh Women's British Open held at Royal Lytham & St Annes on August 2, 2009, Lytham St Annes, England.
Wojciech Migda (wmigda) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

"D" is for Daniel, Beth [born 1956]. Professional golfer. In 1975 while a student at Furman, Daniel won the United States Women's Amateur golf championship—a feat she repeated three more times. In 1979 she turned professional and won Rookie of the Year honors. The following year, with four victories on the pro tour she was named Player of the Year, an award she received again in 1990 and 1994.

"C" is for Cainhoy Riot. The Cainhoy Riot was one of the many deadly frays involving white gun clubs and African American militiamen that erupted during the 1876 gubernatorial campaign. A Republican political meeting was scheduled for October 16th at Brick House some thirty miles up the Cooper River from Charleston. Based upon previous disturbances, African Americans came to the meeting armed. Soon whites from Charleston arrived by steamboat and tried to disrupt the proceedings.

"B" is for Baha'i

Mar 9, 2017

"B" is for Baha'i. Founded in the nineteenth century, the Baha'i faith is one of the world's youngest religions.  Among its principles are the oneness of humankind; the common foundation of all religions; religion and science as integral parts of the truth; the equality of men and women; and the elimination of prejudice of all kinds. Louis G. Gregory, the son of a slave and a native of Charleston, introduced Baha'i teachings into South Carolina. 

"A" is for Adams, James Hopkins [1777-1858]. Governor. Born in lower Richland County and educated at Yale, Adams was a successful and wealthy cotton planter. He represented Richland County in both the South Carolina house and senate. In 1854, the General Assembly elected him governor. Although the state's voters had repudiated secession in 1850, he belonged to the radical faction that advocated immediate secession from the union.

"Y" is for Yellow Jessamine. State flower. In 1924, the General Assembly chose the yellow, or Carolina, jessamine [Gelsemium sempervirens] as the state flower. Among the reasons cited were its being indigenous to every nook and corner of the state and its perpetual return out of the dead of winter suggests the lesson of constancy in, loyalty to, and patriotism in the service of the State.

"W" is for Walker, William [1809-1875]

Mar 6, 2017

"W" is for Walker, William [1809-1875]. Teacher, composer, author. In 1835, the man known as "Singing Billy" Walker published Southern Harmony, a shaped-note hymnal using a four-shape [fa-so-la] system. The shaped-note style is a simplified musical notation-- developed to make it easier for untrained congregations to sing in harmony without instrumental accompaniment.

Dr. J. Brent Morris
USC Beaufort

In this final installment of public Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Brent Morris, associate professor of history and chair of the humanities at the University of South Carolina-Beaufort, talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about the unification of the slave state in South Carolina from 1783 to 1828.

All Stations: Fri, Mar 10, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Mar 12, 4 pm

A volunteer's transport van bears the slogan MAMAS on the Move.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

Many stray dogs from South Carolina are finding homes in other states thanks to Bamberg’s Mary Ann Morris Animal Society, also known as MAMAS.  The no-kill animal shelter has developed a transport system that shuttles dogs to willing owners by way of a “pipeline” of volunteers that relay the animals from North Carolina to Maine and Vermont.  The dedicated volunteers talk about their devotion to saving these pets for new owners who are excited to give them loving homes, and keep in touch with MAMAS to update staff on the lives of dogs they’ve rescued. 

Dr. Lacy Ford
University of South Carolina

Join us for the third public conversation in a four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828. Dr. Lacy Ford, Dean, College of Arts & Sciences University of South Carolina and author of Origins of Southern Radicalism: The South Carolina Upcountry, 1800-1860 and Deliver Us from Evil: The Slavery Question in the Old South, will discuss the ideology and public policy of slavery in the American republic.

For the second lecture in this four-part series of Conversations on South Carolina: The State and the New Nation, 1783-1828, Dr. Larry Watson discusses slavery in South Carolina. Professor Watson is Associate Professor of History & Adjunct Professor of History South Carolina State University and the University of South Carolina. He is author of numerous articles on African American life in the American South.

This series of public conversations is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Southern Studies Institute at the University of South Carolina.

"B" is for Bratton, William [ca. 1742-1815]. Soldier, legislator. Bratton was born in county Antrim, Northern Ireland and immigrated with his family to America not long afterward. Beginning in 1765, an extended family of Brattons moved into present-day York County as part of a larger Scots-Irish migration into the Carolina Piedmont. In 1766, Bratton purchased 200 acres on Fishing Creek and built a two-story log house that is still standing today. During the Revolutionary War, he serve din the militia and rose to the rank of colonel and commanded a regiment in Thomas Sumter’s Brigade.

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