South Carolina

"R" is for Rivers, John Minott [1903—1988]. Broadcasting executive. After college, Rivers, a native of Charleston, moved to Greenville. There he became friends with the president of the Liberty Life Insurance Company that operated WCSC radio in Charleston. In 1938 he became president of South Carolina Broadcasting Company, which operated WCSC. He later purchased the station. In 1948 he began operation of an FM station. In 1953, he put WCSC-TV, South Carolina’s first VHF television station on the air.

Requiem for Mother Emanuel: No. 9
Courtesy of the artist

Renowned South Carolina artist, Leo Twiggs, now 82, has long been fascinated by the contradictions of the South, and he has defined a unique iconography in his work by seizing on certain symbols, especially the Confederate battle flag, its stars and bars, the shape of an “X” and the image of a target, with its sequential rings and bull’s-eye.

Again this year, the fate of a bill to fix state roads and bridges will be determined in the S.C. Senate.

"E" is for Epidemics

Apr 14, 2017

"E" is for Epidemics. An epidemic disease is generally defined as one that affects an unusually high number of individuals within a population or region simultaneously. From the 1680s to the early 20th century, South Carolina—and especially the lowcountry—had a deserved reputation as an unhealthy place. Disease killed enormous numbers of Europeans and Africans, virtually annihilated Native Americans, and proved a significant barrier to European immigration. The biggest contributors to high mortality rates were malaria, dysentery, smallpox and yellow fever.

"D" is for "Dr. Buzzard."  The title "Dr. Buzzard" has been claimed by numerous root workers [practitioners of West African-derived folk medicine and magic, commonly referred to as voodoo, hoodoo, or conjuring] along the South Carolina and Georgia coasts. The best-known, if not original Dr. Buzzard, was Stephany Robinson from St. Helena Island who began practicing root work in the early 1900s. Until his death in 1947, he had a local as well as national clientele. According to legend, Robinson’s father was a "witch doctor" who had been brought directly—and illegally--to St.

"C" is for Chamberlain, Daniel Henry [1835-1907]. Governor. Chamberlain was an officer in the Fifth Massachusetts Cavalry, a black regiment. In 1866 he came to South Carolina to tend to the affairs of a deceased Yale College classmate. He entered politics in 1868 as a delegate from Berkeley County to the state constitutional convention. From 1868 to 1872 he was Attorney General. In 1871, he joined Democrats in organizing a taxpayers’ convention to press for government reform. In 1874 he was the Republican candidate for governor and won the general election.

"B" is for Bennettsville [Marlboro County, population 9,425]. Bennettsville was established on December 14, 1819, when the General Assembly moved the new Marlboro District courthouse to a more central location. The new district seat was named for the sitting governor, Thomas Bennett.  A three-acre square was selected on a bluff overlooking Crooked Creek along the coach road from Society Hill to Fayetteville. By 1824, a Robert Mills-designed courthouse was completed, and a town slowly developed around the square. During World War II German prisoners of war supplied labor for local farms.

West Fraser
westfraserstudio.com

Painting the Southern Coast: The Art of West Fraser (2016, USC Press) is a collection of the works of  one of the nation's most respected painters of representational art. A mastery of his medium and the scope of work ensure his place in Southern art history. A true son of the Lowcountry, Fraser has dedicated much of his career to capturing the lush, primordial beauty of the Southeast's coastal regions that have been altered by man and time.

Double Crested Cormorant fishing.
Andrea Westmoreland [CC BY-SA 2.0 ], via Wikimedia Commons

When the shad are running in South Carolina rivers, the Double Crested Cormorant is out fishing.

"L" is for Lutheran Theologoical Southern Seminary [LTSS]. One of eight seminaries of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, LTSS was established by German Lutherans in 1830. In Columbia since 1911, LTSS previously occupied several sites in South Carolina and Virginia.

Amanda Torruella
Mike Switzer/SC Public Radio

While many are saying that it’s a brave new world for the Latino population in America, a Midlands film festival has, for the first time ever, accepted film submissions from Latin American countries and has made its theme: “Visiones”, which will look at the ways the explosive Latino population growth in the South is impacting our art, film and culture.

Mike Switzer interviews Amada Torruella, co-curator of the Indie Grits film festival at the Nickelodeon Theater in Columbia, SC.

Russ McKinney
Rob Sprankle

Gov. McMaster threatens to veto the proposed gas tax bill, and a bill allowing residents to openly carry a gun without a permit is approved in the House of Representatives.

"H" is for Honey Hill, Battle of [November 30, 1864]. The Battle of Honey Hill was the first in a series of engagements fought along the Charleston and Savannah Railroad in November and December 1864. Federal forces at Port Royal initiated the campaign to support the movement of General Sherman’s army against Savannah. On November 29th a six-thousand man division was transported up the Broad River to Boyd’s Landing.

You’ve heard many financial planners on this show over the years who have pointed out the dismal savings rate for Americans and how that is leading to many financially unprepared retirees.  Our next guest’s organization has decided to try to do something about that.

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