University of South Carolina

Gavin Jackson with Russ McKinney (l) and Andy Shain (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, July 22, 2019.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Post and Courier's Andy Shain and South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney to discuss the recently-elected new president of the University of South Carolina, Robert Caslen.

USC president Robert Caslen during his first press conference Monday, July 22, 2019
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Strides in academic excellence, research and diversity are near-term goals of Robert ‘Bob’ Caslen, the University of South Carolina’s new president. Monday, the retired lieutenant general, who was elected into the role the previous Friday, held his first press conference at the University’s law school. But before talking about these goals and mastering future obstacles, the 29th president first took time to address comments from his recent past that stirred controversy around his candidacy and ultimate election.

Richard T. Greener, circa 1900; by J. H. Cunningham. In The Colored American, February 24, 1900.
The Colored American, February 24, 1900 / Library of Congress/Chronicling America

(Originally broadcast 06/01/18) - Richard Theodore Greener (1844–1922) was a renowned black activist and scholar. The first black graduate of Harvard College, he became the first black faculty member at the University of South Carolina, during Reconstruction. He was even the first black US diplomat to a predominately-white country, serving in Vladivostok, Russia. A notable speaker and writer for racial equality, he also served as a dean of the Howard University School of Law and as the administrative head of the Ulysses S. Grant Monument Association.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z will perform at Williams-Brice stadium on August 21 as part of their On the Run II Tour.
Wikimedia Commons

August 21 will bring the first concert in five years to Columbia’s Williams-Brice Stadium  when Beyoncé and Jay-Z make a stop on their On the Run II Tour.

For Columbia local and Beyoncé superfan Merrell Johnson, this is an especially big event.

North Inlet - Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Aerial view of meandering tidal creeks and extensive pristine marshes in North Inlet Estuary. Vicinity of Georgetown, South Carolina.
NOAA Photo Library/Flickr

Earth Day is held each April to remind people of the importance of caring for our world, according to USC Environmental Health Sciences Professor Joe Jones.  He practices what he preaches, as he regularly takes his students outdoors to pick up trash that has washed into a campus creek from Columbia’s Five Points area, where many students eat and drink.  He tells them that if trash could wash from one part of town to another, it could also get into the Congaree River and thus to the coast, and, ultimately, wash up on the shores of other countries. 

USC's Maxcy College is home to students of many nations.  The International House builds lifelong bridges of friendship and understanding, and prepares many American and foreign students for international careers.
Photo courtesy International House, University of S.C.

The halls of the University of South Carolina’s Maxcy College reflect the voices not only of many students, but of many languages.  Maxcy houses the University’s International House, a living-learning experience for approximately 200 American and international students.  The students derive many benefits from life in International House, from culinary and cultural events to speakers and grant and research opportunities.  Faculty principle Dr.

Massive, Seldom-Staged Bernstein Work Comes to SC

Feb 27, 2018

With musical influences as diverse as jazz, Broadway, rock, and the liturgy of the Catholic Church, Leonard Bernstein’s MASS: A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players, and Dancers is a work that demands versatility from its scores of performers. The range of music genres in Mass, along with the difficulties of coordinating the variety of performing groups for which it calls, make staging the work a seldom-pursued challenge.

USC Law School's Pro Bono program provides student volunteers for legal services throughout South Carolina.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

It’s tax season, and many people are working with tax preparers.  But some preparers are giving away their services for free to elderly or low income clients.  They’re tax law students in the Pro Bono program at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  The Pro Bono program provides volunteer services to many causes year round: clerks for pro bono lawyers, research, wills and other areas of the law. 

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from from Cheryl Stanton, executive director of the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce in Columbia, SC.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Cheryl Stanton, executive director of the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce in Columbia, SC.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager for Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston, SC.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

Travel, history, ghosts and more are among the many subjects of the USC Press' books.
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

The Palmetto State has a prestigious name in the world of publishing: the University of South Carolina Press. Because it’s a non-profit, it can publish scholarly books on important subjects that would not make a profit for commercial publishers, according to Suzanne Axland. But that doesn’t mean the press doesn’t publish for the general interest. It prints a wide variety of books on art, history, Southern culture, beautiful photography and more, even novels, says Axland.

Our program today features an excerpt from the University of South Carolina Moore School's recent Economic Outlook Conference.

Today's excerpt comes from South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster.

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