Walter Edgar

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stroyer, Jacob (ca. 1846- ca. 1908). Clergyman, author. Stroyer was born and raised a slave in antebellum South Carolina. After emancipation, he authored an engrossing autobiographical narrative, My Life in the South, first published in 1879.  Subsequently revised and expanded, the book is a collection of incidents that provides an intimate view of Stroyer’s life as a slave. In 1870 he moved to Worcester, Massachusetts where he studied at Worcester Academy.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Striped Bass. State fish. The striped bass, or ocean rockfish, became the official state fish in 1972. It is one of America’s most popular game fish. Anglers appreciate the striper’s large size and fierce nature, and its table delicacy. Rockfish are caught year-round in South Carolina, being most plentiful during the spring spawning season. The mature fish often weighs 25 to 30 pounds. The largest recorded catch was 125 pounds, with a maximum length of six feet. The rockfish is pink or brown with a silver belly and seven or eight longitudinal stripes on the sides.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Strickland, Lily (1884-1958). Composer, writer, artist. A native of Anderson, Strickland studied piano and composition at Converse. In 1905 she received a scholarship for study at the Institute of Musical arts in New York City (the forerunner of Julliard). She and her husband lived in various parts of the world—notably Africa and Asia. Her travel essays appeared in numerous American magazines and her watercolors graced the covers of her sheet music. A prolific composer, she published 395 musical works for popular, church, and children’s performances.

"S" is for Stretch-Out

Nov 21, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stretch-out. In the aftermath of World War I, with pressure to maintain profit margins, textile mill owners began looking for ways to cut operating costs. The resulting strategies collectively were known as the “stretch-out.” Workdays were extended (without any additional pay), meal breaks were eliminated, workers were forced to tend a larger number of machines (sometimes as many as three times previous workloads), and they were fired if they could not keep up the pace. The result was bitter strikes culminating in the General Strike of 1934.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Strawberry Chapel (Berkeley County). James Child, founder of Childsbury Town on the Cooper River in St. John’s Berkeley Parish, bequeathed an acre and a half for a chapel. The building was completed by 1725, when the Commons House passed an act establishing a parochial chapel of ease at the site. Chapels of ease made services more accessible to those who lived a distance from the parish church. The plan of the chapel is typical of Anglican churches in colonial South Carolina: rectangular with entrances on the north, south, and west sides and a jerkin-head roof.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stowers, Freddie (d. 1918). Soldier, Medal of Honor recipient. This Anderson County native was the nation’s only African American from World War I to be awarded the Medal of Honor. He was drafted in October 1917 and underwent training at Camp Jackson. He was sent overseas as a member of the all-black 93rd Infantry Division. Because white U.S. generals did not want to command black troops, the regiment was attached to the French army. Corporal Stowers distinguished himself in action and lost his life on September 28, 1918.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stono Rebellion (September 1739). The Stono Rebellion was a violent, albeit it failed, attempt of as many as one hundred slaves to reach St. Augustine and claim freedom in Spanish-controlled Florida. The uprising was South Carolina’s largest and bloodiest slave insurrection. The rebellion began when conspirators broke into a store at Stono Bridge and equipped themselves with guns and powder. Lieutenant Governor William Bull encountered the insurgents and fled to raise the alarm. Confident in their numbers, the rebels paused in a field near Jacksonborough.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stoney, Samuel Gaillard (1891-1968). Architect, author, historian, preservationist. Stoney is considered by many to be the quintessential Charlestonian. After graduating with a degree in architecture from Georgia Tech, he worked in Atlanta and New York. In 1933 he began a frank love affair with his native city. President of the South Carolina Historical Society, the Preservation Society, and other organizations, Stoney helped document the city’s past while fighting to save much of its architecture.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stoneman’s Raid (May 1865). This minor cavalry raid through the South Carolina upstate occurred in the weeks following the assassination of President Lincoln and the flight of Confederate president Jefferson Davis and his cabinet from Richmond, Virginia. In mid-April 1865 General William T. Sherman ordered two brigades of General George Stoneman’s federal cavalry under the command of Colonels W.J. Palmer and S.B. Brown into South Carolina to search for Davis and the fugitive Confederate government.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stewart, Thomas McCants (1853-1923). Lawyer, civil rights leader. Born a free person of color in Charleston, McCants achieved national distinction as an African-American leader in the nineteenth century. After attending Avery Normal Institute, he enrolled first at Howard University in Washington—then the University of South Carolina where he earned a B.A. and a law degree. In 1878 he attended Princeton Theological Seminary and, in 1880 became pastor of the Bethel AME Church in New York. There, Stewart emerged as a national civil rights leader and respected attorney.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for State Symbols. As sovereign political entities, all fifty states have adopted special symbols. In every state, the first emblem was a seal. The tradition of designating flowers, trees, and birds as state symbols came into vogue at the turn of the last century. South Carolina adopted the yellow Jessamine as its state flower in 1924. The Sabal palmetto became the state tree in 1939 and the Carolina wren, the official bird in 1948. In 1911, South Carolina and Iowa were the first states of have an official song.

"S" is for State Seal

Nov 11, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for State seal. The great seal of South Carolina was first used May 22, 1777. It was a double-sided, circular device impressed on wax and appended to documents by cords or ribbons. Its principal designers were William Henry Drayton and Arthur Middleton. The inspiration for the design came form the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. The seal obverse showed a palmetto on the shore representing the fort, at the base of which was a blasted oak representing the ships of the Royal Navy. From the tree hung two shields. A palm hung with shields was an ancient Roman emblem of victory.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Stevenson, Ferdinan “Nancy” Backer (1928-2001). Lieutenant governor, civic leader, author. After graduating from Smith College, Stevenson remained in New York. From 1952 to 1954 she worked for the New York Herald Tribune, writing book reviews and doing overseas reporting. In 1956, she moved back to Charleston where she taught junior high school. During the 1960s and 1970s Stevenson was an active civic leader in a number of cultural organizations with a special interest in drama and historic preservation.

"S" is for State Road

Oct 31, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for State Road. In 1818, the General Assembly appropriated funds for roads and canals to improved transportation in the state. As part of this larger effort, construction began on a 110-mile State Road, which would connect Charleston with Columbia. The road was not designed to connect towns in the state and, except for Charleston did not enter a single county seat. The project was a true state enterprise, and for the first four years the laborers were direct state employees. Later, in 1823, all work was contracted out. The expensive undertaking was to be paid for with tolls.

"S" is for State Parks

Oct 30, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

“S” is for State Parks. The genesis of South Carolina’s system of state parks came in the 1930s with the development of sixteen parks under the auspices of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). These early parks, which included recreation facilities such as swimming lakes, trails, and campgrounds, also provided access to some of the state’s most scenic natural areas. With the dissolution of the CCC in 1942, state parks came under the management of the State Commission of Forestry.

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