Walter Edgar

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Coastal Conservation League. Established in 1989, the South Carolina Coastal Conservation League has been a leading voice in the campaign to protect and preserve the coastal plain of the state. The grassroots, nonprofit organization is officiated by a staff and board of directors with offices in Columbia, Georgetown, Charleston, and Beaufort.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for South Carolina Christian Action Council. The South Carolina Christian Action Council is a statewide ecumenical agency embracing many of the state’s major Christian denominations. It provides educational programs for its constituents and a Christian witness in public affairs. Its origins can be traced to 1933 and the formation of the South Carolina Federated Forces for Temperance and Law Observance. Reorganized in 1951, the organization set for a broader understanding of the agency’s mission. The council became involved in race relations and ministry to the handicapped.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"M" is for Myrtle Beach Pavilion. Located at 812 North Ocean Boulevard in the heart of Myrtle beach, the Myrtle Beach Pavilion Amusement Park’s eleven acres of roller coaster, thrill rides, go-kart tracks, arcades, shops, and games were part of a tradition for generations of seaside visitors. Built in the early twentieth century, the original pavilion was a wooden structure and was used principally for dances during the summer season. In 1923 it was replaced by a new pavilion with a restaurant and concessions stands. That pavilion burned in 1944.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Post and Courier (2010 circulation: 86,084 daily and 94,940 Sunday). Published in Charleston, the Post and Courier is the oldest daily newspaper in South Carolina. The publication’s lineage can be traced through three newspapers.  The Charleston Courier  (1803) and the Charleston Daily News (1865) merged in 1873 and became the News and Courier. The third newspaper, the Evening Post began publication in 1894.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Potter’s Raid (April 5-21, 1865). General Edward E. Potter’s raid into the lowcountry and central South Carolina was neither massive nor particularly crucial to Union victory. In March 1865, while the rest of Sherman’s army marched into North Carolina, a detachment of Union soldiers drove toward Darlington in hopes of breaking the area’s railroad connections. Meeting resistance, they fell back. The failure irked Sherman who ordered that as much force as necessary be used to accomplish the mission.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Pottersville. Pottersville originated in Edgefield District between 1819 and 1820 around the stoneware factory of Abner Landrum a mile and a half north of the town of Edgefield. Landrum’s was the first significant stoneware factory in the district. The owner established the community for the factory’s free tradesmen and enslaved workers, but other craftsmen whose trades supported the wares manufacture and transportation lived in the village. By the 1830s, the settlement had a population of 150 persons.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"P" is for Prehistoric South Carolina. During the last Ice Age human groups may have made their way to what became South Carolina as early as 18,000 years ago—but a time frame of 13,000 years ago is widely accepted by archaeologists. After the Ice Age there were successive waves of cultural development. The Early Archaic period (10,000-8,000 B.C.E.) saw a population explosion. During the Middle Archaic period (8,000-5,000 B.C.E.) stone tools and spear points developed.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Smyth, Ellison Adger (1847-1942). Industrialist. Smyth left the South Carolina Military Academy in 1864 to join the Confederate army. His business career began immediately after the war as a clerk in a wholesale hardware firm. In the late 1870s, in cooperation with Charleston capitalist Francis J. Pelzer, Smyth decided to organize a cotton mill on the Saluda River in Anderson County. Pelzer Manufacturing Company began operations in 1881 with Smyth as president. He remained as president until 1923 when he sold the firm.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Smith, William Loughton (1758-1812). Lawyer, congressman, diplomat. In 1770, Smith was sent to Europe for schooling and remained there throughout the Revolutionary War. Returning to South Carolina, he was elected to the General Assembly and, in 1788, to the U.S. House of Representatives. His support for a stronger central government placed him squarely in the Federalist Party. He advocated Alexander Hamilton’s proposal that the central government fund the national debt, assume state debts, and form a national bank.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Smith, William (ca. 1762-1840). U.S. Senator. After attending Mount Zion College in Winnsboro, Smith opened a law practice in York District. He was also a successful planter acquiring land holdings across the state and in Alabama and Louisiana. He was a Jeffersonian of the purist stripe, espousing strict-constructionist and states’ rights principles. He represented York in the South Carolina House and Senate. In 1816 he was elected to the U.S. Senate.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

S" is for Smith, Thomas (ca. 1648-1694) Governor. Born in England, Smith immigrated with his family to Carolina in 1683—likely as a member of the great Dissenter migration to the province in the 1680s. He obtained a landgrave’s grant (48,000 acres) that was known as Wiskinboo Barony. In 1688 the Proprietors named him a commissioner of customs and later, a member of the Grand Council. After he married the widowed owner of Medway plantation in 1688, Smith successfully petitioned the Proprietors to transfer the plantation to him.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"S" is for Smith, Nell Whitely (1929-2011). Legislator, educator, businesswoman. A native of North Carolina, Nell married Harris Page Smith and moved with him to Easley where she taught junior high school science. Later, she opened her own business, House Antiques and Gifts. In July 1981 on the death of her husband, a state senator Senate District No. 1 (Abbeville, Anderson, Oconee, and Pickens), she was elected to fill his unexpired term. In 1984, after redistricting, she was elected to two full terms for District No. 2 (Pickens).

"C" is for Columbia

Jun 7, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Columbia (Richland County; 2010 population 130,493). Named for Christopher Columbus and created in 1786 as the nation’s first truly planned capital city, Columbia has a unique history. While now the setting for state, county, and municipal governments, it took shape in the wilderness near the geographic center of South Carolina. The original plan for the city was a grid two miles square containing 400 blocks. Most exceptional were the wide streets. In 1950, Columbia embraced the city-manager government.

"C" is for Colonoware

Jun 6, 2019
South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Colonoware. On historic-period sites in South Carolina, archaeologists often find locally made, hand-built unglazed pottery that was fired in open hearths rather than kilns. Vessels and sherds of this ware may be found on the sites of Indian camps and villages, the city lots of Charleston and other towns, underwater near wharves and ferries, and on small farms and plantations. This broad class of pottery has been termed colonoware. This pottery is most closely associated with Native Americans and African Americans, but associations vary considerably.

South Carolina From A to Z
SC Public Radio

"C" is for Colonial Agents. South Carolina, like Britain’s other American colonies, had no elected representatives in Parliament to argue for its interests. The problem for the colony then was how to get Parliament to pay attention to its particular concerns. Parliament, too, desired an informed source on its distant settlement. The answer--beginning in 1712--was a permanent colonial agent, paid for by the colony’s Commons House of Assembly. He reported regularly to the Commons House on matters of interest to the colony.

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