Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

If your mail has not been showing up some days, or you're getting second notices on the bills you thought you'd paid, you're not alone. The U.S. Postal Service has been beset by continuing delays in delivering the mail.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy is developing a 10-year strategic plan to address those problems, and will discuss the proposal before the House oversight committee Wednesday.

But it's already drawing criticism from congressional Democrats and some of the Post Office's biggest customers.

With his agency facing continued delivery delays and financial issues, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy will appear before a congressional panel Wednesday. He's working on reform, but some want him out.

The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump won't be hearing from witnesses after all.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The Senate voted Saturday morning to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, a move that was reversed a few hours later with a deal to allow a key statement into the record.

Former President Donald Trump's lawyers on Friday began their defense in his Senate impeachment trial, with attorney Michael van der Veen calling it an "unjust and blatantly unconstitutional act of political vengeance" and a "politically motivated witch hunt."

Van der Veen, a Pennsylvania trial attorney, defended Trump's Jan. 6 speech outside the White House in which Trump exhorted a crowd of supporters that "if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore."

Many of those supporters went on to storm the U.S. Capitol.

Updated at 1:16 p.m. ET

U.S. Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman, already lauded as a hero for his actions during the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol, received more praise Wednesday after new video showed him directing Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, away from the mob.

Former President Donald Trump's remarks on the Ellipse on Jan. 6, urging his supporters to march on the Capitol as Congress was certifying the results of November's presidential election, are a key part of the case against Trump being made by House impeachment managers and are also being used by the lawyers who are defending him.

Updated at 11:54 a.m. ET

The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump will feature evidence "that nobody has seen before," House Democrats say.

The trial gets under way Tuesday with up to four hours of arguments about the constitutionality of the Senate weighing whether to convict a former president no longer in office.

Updated at 3:33 p.m. ET

Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg made history Tuesday, becoming the first openly gay man to win Senate confirmation to run a Cabinet department.

Buttigieg was easily confirmed as secretary of transportation by a vote of 86-13.

After the vote, Buttigieg tweeted that he was "honored and humbled by today's vote in the Senate-and ready to get to work."

Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday he welcomes the positive news about an additional COVID-19 vaccine announced in the past 24 hours, calling the results "really encouraging." And he added that the Biden administration hoped to be able to start vaccinating children by late spring or summer.

Updated on Feb. 2 at 4:40 p.m. ET

It's been a rocky few months for the U.S. Postal Service.

Numerous lawsuits were filed over the post office's handling of mail-in ballots during November's elections. Then came the holiday season, and customers became frustrated by backlogs that meant their Christmas cards and packages weren't delivered until January.

Among those frustrated is Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., who says cards his office sent to constituents on Dec. 1 are still arriving at homes in his district.

Pascrell says enough is enough.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated at 3:33 p.m. ET

Saying it's time to act "because that's what faith and morality require us to do," President Biden on Tuesday signed four executive actions aimed at advancing racial equity for Americans the White House says have been underserved and left behind.

Biden said Tuesday that the measures follow one of his core campaign promises: to restore "the soul of the nation," as he often said during the presidential race.

"Our soul will be troubled," he said, "as long as systemic racism is allowed to exist."

President Biden traveled from the U.S. Capitol across the Potomac River to Arlington National Cemetery after his inauguration ceremony Wednesday afternoon to lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

He was joined by Vice President Harris as well as former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, along with their spouses and members of their families.

Biden and Harris each touched the wreath, and Biden made the sign of the cross before saluting. A military bugler then played taps.

President-elect Joe Biden, who will become the nation's second Roman Catholic president, is attending Mass this morning, along with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and congressional leaders at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C.

It's a church Biden attended both as vice president and as a senator, and it was the site of a service for the first Catholic president, John F. Kennedy, after his 1963 assassination.

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