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Dave Mistich

Dave Mistich is the Charleston Reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting. A native of Washington, West Virginia, Dave can be heard throughout week on West Virginia Public Radio, including during West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia. He also anchors local newscasts during Weekend Edition on Saturday mornings and covers the House of Delegates for The Legislature Today.

Since joining West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, Dave has produced stories that range from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. He has also contributed to NPR's newscasts upon three occasions thus far—covering the natural gas line explosion in Sissonville in December, U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller's announcement that he won't seek reelection in 2014 and the murder of Mingo County Sheriff Eugene Crum.

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including Relix, The Charleston Daily Mail and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He is also finishing a Master of Arts Journalism degree there and is hopelessly trying to complete a thesis which focuses on America’s first critically-oriented rock magazine, Crawdaddy!

  • A Democrat senator from West Virginia says he will vote against one of the party's most significant voting rights bills in years, effectively overturning the legislation.
  • “O” is for Old Iron District. In the vicinity of the Broad River near the northern border of South Carolina, there are significant deposits of magnetite and specular oxide iron ore, as well as some lesser belts of hematite. Early colonists took advantage of these resources and began to produce iron before the Revolutionary War. By 1860 there were eight furnaces in operation in the state. Production declined after the Civil War due to competition from anthracite furnaces operating in other parts of the nation produced iron at lower cost that the charcoal iron produced in South Carolina. By the end of the nineteenth century, the industry had disappeared from the state. Cherokee County—centered in the middle of the once-prosperous iron industry in South Carolina is sometimes referred to as the Old Iron District.
  • “O” is for Old Iron District. In the vicinity of the Broad River near the northern border of South Carolina, there are significant deposits of magnetite and specular oxide iron ore, as well as some lesser belts of hematite. Early colonists took advantage of these resources and began to produce iron before the Revolutionary War. By 1860 there were eight furnaces in operation in the state. Production declined after the Civil War due to competition from anthracite furnaces operating in other parts of the nation produced iron at lower cost that the charcoal iron produced in South Carolina. By the end of the nineteenth century, the industry had disappeared from the state. Cherokee County—centered in the middle of the once-prosperous iron industry in South Carolina is sometimes referred to as the Old Iron District.
  • Republican Gov. Jim Justice says his plan to cut income taxes will entice throngs of people to move to West Virginia and maybe attract the next major amusement park. Critics say the plan is naive.
  • On June 20, 1863, West Virginia seceded from Virginia to align with the Union during the Civil War. It rejected the Confederacy then, but the state hasn't taken down any Confederate statues in 2020.
  • Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justices Allen Loughry and Elizabeth Walker face impeachment trials in the state Senate. The fourth justice, Robin Davis, announced her retirement Tuesday.
  • Election officials have traditionally focused on a smooth voting experience, but after the 2016 elections, they've also had to focus on cybersecurity.
  • The strike has shut down public schools since last Thursday. Union leaders met with Gov. Jim Justice, and they have reached a deal for pay raises. State lawmakers would need to pass the proposals.
  • Two counties remain under a state of emergency after a train carrying oil derailed on Monday. Dozens of residents around Armstrong Creek evacuated after several rail cars caught fire next to a river.