Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, along with Steve Inskeep and David Greene.

Before taking on this role in December 2016, Martin was the host of Weekend Edition Sunday for four years. Martin also served as National Security Correspondent for NPR, where she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to a U.S. Air Force base in New Mexico for a rare look at how the military trains drone pilots.

Martin was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project, based in New York — a two-hour daily multimedia program that she co-hosted with Alison Stewart and Mike Pesca.

In 2006-2007, Martin served as NPR's religion correspondent. Her piece on Islam in America was awarded "Best Radio Feature" by the Religion News Writers Association in 2007. As one of NPR's reporters assigned to cover the Virginia Tech massacre that same year, she was on the school's campus within hours of the shooting and on the ground in Blacksburg, Va., covering the investigation and emotional aftermath in the following days.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Martin worked as a NPR foreign correspondent from 2005-2006. During her time in Europe, she covered the London terrorist attacks, the federal elections in Germany, the 2006 World Cup and issues surrounding immigration and shifting cultural identities in Europe.

Her foreign reporting experience extends beyond Europe. Martin has also worked extensively in Afghanistan. She began reporting from there as a freelancer during the summer of 2003, covering the reconstruction effort in the wake of the U.S. invasion. In fall 2004, Martin returned for several months to cover Afghanistan's first democratic presidential election. She has reported widely on women's issues in Afghanistan, the fledgling political and governance system and the U.S.-NATO fight against the insurgency. She has also reported from Iraq, where she covered U.S. military operations and the strategic alliance between Sunni sheiks and the U.S. military in Anbar province.

Martin started her career at public radio station KQED in San Francisco, as a producer and reporter.

She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and a Master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University.

Megan Stack, a former foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, gave up a life of covering war and natural disasters when she had her first child in Beijing.

She quickly hired a nanny and soon realized how dependent she had become on this woman — something she writes about in her book Women's Work: A Reckoning with Work and Home.

Stack spoke with NPR about the book — and the difficult decision to write about her own family.

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So what happens now that the wall has come down? It's a question on the mind of "Game Of Thrones" fans, of course, but also Democratic presidential candidates.

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As soon as the Mueller report came out, President Trump was quick to go on offense, saying it's time to investigate the investigators. Now his attorney general is following suit.

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Temporary employees fill a very specific need at a specific time, and they can give employers flexibility. But what happens when those temp workers are working at the highest levels of the U.S. government?

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A month ago, Kirstjen Nielsen went before Congress and told a House committee this.

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From 1991 to 1994, Nirvana was one of the biggest bands in the world with a look and sound that would come to define the decade's music. At the height of this fame, though, bandleader Kurt Cobain sometimes seemed to be an unwilling participant who had just been swept up and carried away by Nirvana's success. Then, after less than four years of meteoric fame, Cobain died of suicide on April 5, 1994. He was 27.

When an artist finds their song climbing up the Billboard charts for the first time, it's usually a cause for celebration. But in the case of 19-year-old rapper Lil Nas X and his viral hit, "Old Town Road (I Got Horses in the Back)," it's also been a cause of controversy.

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For 18 years now, the White House staff has included a woman named Tricia Newbold. She served a Republican president, then a Democrat and then President Trump, whose administration she now accuses of security lapses.

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President Trump means to stop migration from Central America by cutting off funding that was meant to stop that migration.

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The investigation is over. Robert Mueller says no collusion. Attorney General William Barr says no obstruction. Democrats, though, want to see the proof.

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This story begins in 1967, when Israel was at war with much of the Arab world. Israeli soldiers seized a patch of land from Syria. It's land President Trump now says they never need to give back.

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The FAA has been without a permanent chief for more than a year. That soon may change, though.

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New Zealand is deciding what it will and won't do in response to a mass shooting.

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Tragic news from New Zealand.

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The man who stood on stage with Donald Trump when he accepted the Republican nomination for president has now been sentenced to almost four years in prison.

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Rescue crews in Alabama are searching for survivors - this after the deadliest tornado in the U.S. since 2013.

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Today, a man who used to be one of President Trump's closest confidants will testify before Congress, and he will testify that President Trump committed a crime - not just during the campaign, but after he was inaugurated.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET Friday

Weeks after Jussie Smollett reported being assaulted in a potential hate crime, the Empire actor has been released on bail after police questioned him for allegedly orchestrating the attack. Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said Smollett faked the incident, paying two brothers about $3,500 to join a "publicity stunt" staged by Smollett because he "was dissatisfied with his salary."

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We begin with the story of a 24-year-old woman who fled America to join ISIS. She is pleading with the U.S. government to allow her to return home.

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President Trump is starting his 2020 campaign with a push to change the president in a different country.

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Donald Trump, the president of the United States, has never been one to hold back when he doesn't like something.

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They were under a whole lot of pressure to make it happen, and now Congress says they have a deal to prevent another government shutdown.

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How can President Trump get himself out of a corner?

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President Trump will deliver the State of the Union tonight, but he will do it in Nancy Pelosi's House.

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When he refused to resign over a racist photo, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam allowed one caveat.

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