background_fid.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Pharyngial Teeth?

The pharyngeal teeth of an Aisian grass carp
Ohio State University Bio Museum
/
The pharyngeal teeth of an Aisian grass carp

A listener finds part of the remains of a grass carp on the beach. This Asian species has "pharyngial teeth."

In the United States, the species was first imported in 1963 from Taiwan and Malaysia to aquaculture facilities in Alabama and Arkansas. The first release is believed to have been an accidental escape in 1966 from the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Fish Farming Experimental Station in Stuttgart, Arkansas, followed by planned introductions beginning in 1969.  Subsequently, there have been widespread introductions; by the 1970s the species had been introduced to 40 states, and it has since been reported in 45 of the country's 50 states. In 2013 it was determined to be reproducing in the Great Lakes Basin. It is still stocked in many states as an effective biocontrol for undesirable aquatic vegetation, many species of which are themselves introduced.

Rudy Mancke served as naturalist and co-host of South Carolina ETV's NatureScene, which began its long run in 1978. His field trips, broadcast nationwide, have earned him a legion of dedicated viewers. Rudy's knowledge of the complex inner-workings of different ecosystems and his great admiration for the natural world make him the perfect guide. In fact, the National Wildlife Federation and the Garden Club of America honored his commitment to resource conservation with special awards. Since retiring from SCETV, Rudy has gone on to teach at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.