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South Carolina's Progressives and World War I

Written on print: "Spartanburg, S.C. Saxon Mills; 'Girl workers in the half-time mill school.'"
Library of Congress/Goldsberry Collection of open-air school photographs.
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Written on print: "Spartanburg, S.C. Saxon Mills; 'Girl workers in the half-time mill school.'"

(Originally broadcast 03/02/18) - There were progressives in South Carolina in 1918. And the progressive movement in this state was different from the movement in the Northeast. However, the United States’ entrance into World War I provided an extra momentum to the movement that led to some fundamental changes the interaction between state and federal authority that lasted through the 20th century.

Dr. William Link, from the University of Florida, has a public conversation with Walter Edgar about Progressives in South Carolina in World War I. The conversation was recorded at the University of South Carolina’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on February 06, 2018. It was part of a series presented in January and February, 2018, and sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.

All Stations: Fri, Aug 24, 12 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, Aug 25, 4 pm

Dr. Walter Edgar has two programs on South Carolina Public Radio: Walter Edgar's Journal, and South Carolina from A to Z. Dr. Edgar receivedhisA.B.degreefromDavidson College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1969. After two years in the army (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), he returned to USC as a post-doctoral fellow of the National Archives, assigned to the Papers of Henry Laurens.