© 2021
Radio Website Header-Waves 6 3.0.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Remembering Hurricane Hugo

NOAA satellite infrared image of Hurrricane Hugo, 12:01 a.m., Sept. 22, 1989.
NOAA
/
NOAA satellite infrared image of Hurrricane Hugo, 12:01 a.m., Sept. 22, 1989.

Thirty years ago this month, the strongest and most costly hurricane to strike South Carolina in the 20th century made landfall. Hurricane Hugo was a Category 4 storm when it came ashore just slightly north of Charleston, on Isle of Palms on September 22. The hurricane had 140 mph sustained winds, with gusts to more than 160 mph and brought a storm surge of over 20 feet to McClellanville, SC. Thirty-five people lost their lives to the storm and its aftermath in South Carolina. Damage from Hugo in South Carolina was estimated at $5.9 billion.

Walter Edgar talks with Bo Peterson of Charleston’s Post & Courier newspaper about the impact of Hugo. And, we’ll delve into the Journal’s archive for a past conversation with survivors of the storm surge in McClellanville.

All Stations: Fri, Sep 13, 2019, 12 pm | News & Talk Stations: Sun, Sep 15, 4 pm

Dr. Walter Edgar has two programs on South Carolina Public Radio: Walter Edgar's Journal, and South Carolina from A to Z. Dr. Edgar receivedhisA.B.degreefromDavidson College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1969. After two years in the army (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), he returned to USC as a post-doctoral fellow of the National Archives, assigned to the Papers of Henry Laurens.