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Composers

  • In addition to his own works, Lizt's recitals featured pieces by all the great composers of the day and by those he called the “classics,” including many works of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven.
  • In addition to his own works, Lizt's recitals featured pieces by all the great composers of the day and by those he called the “classics,” including many works of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven.
  • Franz Liszt invented the solo piano recital, and in fact he coined the term “recital,” too.
  • Claude Debussy often performed his own works, but he tended to get nervous, and he didn’t enjoy playing in public. And yet by all accounts Debussy was a wonderful pianist, especially noted for his remarkable “touch” at the keyboard.
  • Claude Debussy often performed his own works, but he tended to get nervous, and he didn’t enjoy playing in public. And yet by all accounts Debussy was a wonderful pianist, especially noted for his remarkable “touch” at the keyboard.
  • What I somehow hear in Mozart, whether in his operas or his instrumental works, is a kind of fundamental optimism.
  • What I somehow hear in Mozart, whether in his operas or his instrumental works, is a kind of fundamental optimism.
  • After Beethoven, all composers were seen and evaluated in Beethoven’s light, or rather in his enormous shadow.
  • After Beethoven, all composers were seen and evaluated in Beethoven’s light, or rather in his enormous shadow.
  • In 1838, ten years after the death of Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann traveled to Vienna, and while he was there he paid a visit to the graves of Schubert and Beethoven. On a whim, Schumann decided to call on Schubert’s brother, Ferdinand, who was living in Vienna, and this turned out to be perhaps the most fortuitous social call in the history of music.