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flooding

  • The signs are there: our coastal cities are increasingly susceptible to flooding as the climate changes. Charleston, South Carolina, is no exception, and is one of the American cities most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Lowcountry at High Tide: A History of Flooding, Drainage, and Reclamation in Charleston, South Carolina (USC Press, 2010) is the first book to deal with the topographic evolution of Charleston, its history of flooding from the seventeenth century to the present, and the efforts made to keep its populace high and dry, as well as safe and healthy.Author Christina Rae Butler talks with Walter Edgar about talk about Charleston’s topographic history and the challenges it faces in the 21st century.
  • The signs are there: our coastal cities are increasingly susceptible to flooding as the climate changes. Charleston, South Carolina, is no exception, and is one of the American cities most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Lowcountry at High Tide: A History of Flooding, Drainage, and Reclamation in Charleston, South Carolina (USC Press, 2010) is the first book to deal with the topographic evolution of Charleston, its history of flooding from the seventeenth century to the present, and the efforts made to keep its populace high and dry, as well as safe and healthy.Author Christina Rae Butler talks with Walter Edgar about talk about Charleston’s topographic history and the challenges it faces in the 21st century.
  • The City of Columbia has the financing in place to repair damage to the Columbia Canal wrought by the historic flood of 2015.
  • Tropical depression Mindy has dumped rain along the Georgia and South Carolina seacoasts during its trek over land and is now moving well offshore into the Atlantic Ocean. Mindy was a brief-lived tropical storm that formed Wednesday in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and then made landfall Wednesday night in St. Vincent Island in the Florida Panhandle. Downgraded to a tropical depression over land, the storm dumped rain across the Panhandle and parts of Geogia and South Carolina in crossing a small part of the U.S. Southeast. The storm on Thursday evening was offshore about 110 miles east-southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Forecasters say it will become a remnant low on Friday.
  • South Carolina's new Office of Resilience will team with the SC Floodwater Commission to reduce future damage from hurricane and extreme weather-caused flooding.
  • A company that builds cages for inmate transport vans will pay $1 million to the family of a woman who drowned in floodwaters while trapped inside a sheriff’s department van outfitted by the company. WBTW-TV reports a court has approved the agreement between American Aluminum Accessories and the family of Nicolette Green.
  • For centuries residents of Charleston, SC, have made many attempts, both public and private, to manipulate the landscape of the low-lying peninsula on…
  • For centuries residents of Charleston, SC, have made many attempts, both public and private, to manipulate the landscape of the low-lying peninsula on…
  • Two weeks after the president visited their neighborhood in Conway, Bill and Diane Parker sit on a sofa in their front yard, surrounded by furniture.…
  • How do you raise a large, historic home? Better yet, how do you put it back down? Should such an old home be raised at all? All are tough questions in a…