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moths

  • Commonly known the tobacco hornworm and the goliath worm (as larvae), and as the Carolina sphinx moth and the tobacco hawk moth (as adults), the Manduca sexta is closely related to and often confused with the very similar tomato hornworm (Manduca quinquemaculata).
  • Commonly known the tobacco hornworm and the goliath worm (as larvae), and as the Carolina sphinx moth and the tobacco hawk moth (as adults), the Manduca sexta is closely related to and often confused with the very similar tomato hornworm (Manduca quinquemaculata).
  • The ailanthus webworm moth (Atteva aurea) is an ermine moth now found commonly in the United States. It was formerly known under the scientific name Atteva punctella (see Taxonomy section). This small, very colorful moth resembles a true bug or beetle when not in flight, but in flight it resembles a wasp.
  • The ailanthus webworm moth (Atteva aurea) is an ermine moth now found commonly in the United States. It was formerly known under the scientific name Atteva punctella (see Taxonomy section). This small, very colorful moth resembles a true bug or beetle when not in flight, but in flight it resembles a wasp.
  • Dryocampa rubicunda, the rosy maple moth, is a small North American moth in the family Saturniidae, also known as the great silk moths. It was first described by Johan Christian Fabricius in 1793. The species is known for its wooly body and pink and yellow coloration, which varies from cream or white to bright pink or yellow.[2] Males have bushier antennae than females, which allow them to sense female pheromones for mating.
  • Dryocampa rubicunda, the rosy maple moth, is a small North American moth in the family Saturniidae, also known as the great silk moths. It was first described by Johan Christian Fabricius in 1793. The species is known for its wooly body and pink and yellow coloration, which varies from cream or white to bright pink or yellow.[2] Males have bushier antennae than females, which allow them to sense female pheromones for mating.
  • Two moths living in South Carolina, two different ways of pupating...
  • Two moths living in South Carolina, two different ways of pupating...
  • Enyo lugubris, the mournful sphinx, is a moth of the family Sphingidae. It is found from Argentina and Paraguay to Uruguay, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil and the West Indies through Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama to Mexico and the United States, where it has been recorded from Arizona east to Florida and north to South Carolina. Strays have been recorded from Arkansas, north to Illinois, Michigan and New York.
  • Enyo lugubris, the mournful sphinx, is a moth of the family Sphingidae. It is found from Argentina and Paraguay to Uruguay, Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, French Guiana, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil and the West Indies through Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama to Mexico and the United States, where it has been recorded from Arizona east to Florida and north to South Carolina. Strays have been recorded from Arkansas, north to Illinois, Michigan and New York.