© 2022 South Carolina Public Radio
Radio Website Header-Waves 6 3.0.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

snakes

  • The eastern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon platyrhinos), also known as the spreading adder and many other common names, is a species of mildly venomous rear-fanged snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to North America.
  • The eastern hog-nosed snake (Heterodon platyrhinos), also known as the spreading adder and many other common names, is a species of mildly venomous rear-fanged snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to North America.
  • The northern redbelly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata) is a nonvenomous snake in the family Colubridae, a subspecies of Storeria occipitomaculata. It is sometimes referred to as a fire snake. It is endemic, North America and The Caribbean in some parts in Jamaica, and Saskatchewan to Nova Scotia in the north and south to Florida and Texas.
  • The northern redbelly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata) is a nonvenomous snake in the family Colubridae, a subspecies of Storeria occipitomaculata. It is sometimes referred to as a fire snake. It is endemic, North America and The Caribbean in some parts in Jamaica, and Saskatchewan to Nova Scotia in the north and south to Florida and Texas.
  • With warming weather, snakes are active.
  • With warming weather, snakes are active.
  • Imantodes cenchoa (common names: blunthead tree snake, fiddle-string snake, mapepire corde violon) is a species of rear-fanged mildly venomous snake in the Family Colubridae. The species is native to in Mexico, Central America, and South America.
  • Imantodes cenchoa (common names: blunthead tree snake, fiddle-string snake, mapepire corde violon) is a species of rear-fanged mildly venomous snake in the Family Colubridae. The species is native to in Mexico, Central America, and South America.
  • Rudy helps identify a snake in a 1950s photo taken by William D. Workman.
  • Rudy helps identify a snake in a 1950s photo taken by William D. Workman.