coronavirus

Kaitlyn Cannon / SCETV

Business is suffering some of the worst effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Some, like restaurants, may not be able to make it back, even if our collective quarantine were to end today.

But a few industries are doing very well. In York County, at least, residential real estate is cruising along, thanks in part to historically low interest rates and an already healthy market in the ever-growing Charlotte metro region.

MUSC.care

Mar 23, 2020
Dr. Edward O'Brian
Bobbi Conner/MUSC

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Edward O’Bryan about MUSC.care - a   virtual urgent care website (with free online access) for people in S.C. to access respiratory illness screenings and testing orders related to possible coronavirus symptoms.    Dr. O’Bryan is an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Telehealth Director at MUSC. 

Pallets of personal protective equipment and other supplies for distribution in SC
Sgt. Tim Andrews/ South Carolina National Guard

The number of COVID19 Cases in South Carolina continued to rise over the weekend. As of Sunday, the state’s Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) was investigating 195 cases and in a statement said it expected more cases to be documented.

“We want people to be prepared for more cases to occur and to continue to listen to and follow recommendations from public health officials,” said agency physician Dr. Brannon Traxler.

Members of the SC House of Representatives spill into the House balcony to insure proper "social distancing" during debate on Thursday, March 19, 2020
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

Like the state as a whole, the Sc General Assembly is being impacted by the coronavirus. The House and Senate held separate, one day sessions this week to approve an emergency appropriation for DHEC to help the public health agency deal with the growing pandemic.

A larger concern on the horizon for state lawmakers however is next year’s state operating budget, and how it might be impacted.

South Carolina’s Mental Health Centers Remain Open

Mar 19, 2020
abstract mental health symbol
GDJ via Pixabay

Update, March 23, 2020: The Spartanburg Area Mental Health Center is now condusting routine consultations onlythrough phone and video. Director Roger Williams says serious cases, new patients, and patients exhibiting suicidal tendencies are still being seen in-person, after screening outside the building.

You can hear it in her voice.  Cacky Rivers who routinely eases the anxiety of brides on their big day is nervous.

"My dad said recently, 'This too shall pass', and that's what's kept me going."

Her voice trails off.  There's a long pause on the other end of the phone.

The "this" Rivers is referring to is the Coronavirus pandemic that has spread across the globe leaving a trail of death and economic uncertainty behind.

“It's a very scary situation," Rivers says.

She likens it to a hurricane, but worse.

The South Carolina Lede is here to keep you up to date on important news as the Palmetto State faces the COVID-19 virus.  There is so much news out there right now it’s overwhelming. This podcast is for you to get information that matters to you, your family and your fellow South Carolinians. No hype. No fear. Just COVID-19 news and resources to get us all through this.

On this episode for March 18, 2020, we look at emergency funding measures passed by the state Senate, what a feeding operation for students in Kershaw County looks like and what the scene was like in Five Points on the last night bars were open in the state.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Rock Hill has two services the city's homeless population uses on a daily basis to get something to eat. One is the MyRide bus system, a free, citywide service for all; the other is the Dorothy Day Soup Kitchen,

MyRide drops off across the street from the soup kitchen Monday through Saturday at around 11:30 a.m. There, a usually packed No. 2 route bus mostly empties and riders make their way to a hot lunch at one of the soup kitchen's tables, amid plenty of chatty company.

On Monday, lunch was not hot, not chatty, and not served on a plate taken to a table. It was a ham and cheese sandwich, a ham buscuit, some snacks, and a diet Mountain Dew, placed inside a plastic shopping bag and given at the door. Guests took their lunches, thanking the women who give them, and strolling away to various places on a chilly, cloudy morning.

It is a meal most certainly made on the fly, in reaction to a stunning and sudden outbreak of a pandemic

that demands people all over the United States keep their distance from each other. Jan Stephenson, the director of Dorothy Day Soup Kitchen, says the sandwich-and-biscuit lunch is not ideal, but it is what could be done today.

Aerial view of MUSC's drive-through collection site in West Ashley where people can be swabbed for the coronavirus from their carss
Sarah Pack/ MUSC

It's not the typical thick, green coating of pollen that has people scrambling indoors this spring in Charleston.

Instead it's something much more serious; a highly contagious coronavirus with a spiky crown, prickling communities with fear and prompting the World Health Organization to declare a pandemic.

But like the pesky pollen, the new and potentially deadly virus is striking at the start of Charleston's busy tourist season.

Rick Tap / Unsplash

If you’re getting nervous about the economy based on the coronavirus’ effect on the stock market and on global oil prices, your worries might be premature.

Monday, State epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell, DHEC Director Rick Toomey and Gov. McMaster give update on COVID 19 Cases in South Carolina.
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Updated, 3/12/2020

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) is investigating one new possible case of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus in Lancaster County. This brings the total number of presumptive positive cases to eight, along with two confirmed cases.

The new case is a woman from Lancaster County. DHEC said a contact investigation is underway, and at this time there is no known travel outside the state or known contact with another case.

According to the agency, the woman’s samples tested positive at DHEC’s Public Health Laboratory and she is currently hospitalized and isolated. DHEC is working with the healthcare facility and taking routine measures to prevent possible spread.

“Our top priorities remain preventing spread of the disease and protecting public health,” said Dr. Linda Bell, State Epidemiologist. “Our systems for protecting public health are working. We’re continuing to work with the CDC and our state and local partners, however, based on what’s occurring in other states and countries, we expect community spread to grow.”

As of Wednesday, DHEC tested a total of 51 individuals for COVID-19, which includes the eight presumptive positive cases and two confirmed cases.

--PREVIOUS REPORT--

7 Presumptive Positive COVID-19 Cases in S.C.- DHEC: Risk to Public Remains Low

Seven people in South Carolina have presumptively tested positive for coronavirus

Monday afternoon DHEC announced an older man in Camden, in Kershaw County, is the latest case. The man is currently in self-isolation at his home. State epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell said he had been in direct contact with a person who previously tested positive for the virus. This now brings the total cases in Kershaw County to five.

Now that the CDC has identified the first cases of non-travel-related COVID-19 coronavirus in the US, federal and state agencies have begun to step up their response plans to handle what are likely more cases to come. Here in South Carolina, state agencies are also being diligent in their preparations. But, in the meantime, what measures should we be taking on an individual level for both prevention and the possibility of a self-quarantine? I checked in with Dr.

World Health Organization

As of Tuesday, the World Health Organization(WHO) identified 59 cases of COVID-19 in the United States. None are in South Carolina; but the case that has U.S. health officials wary is one from California. It was reported earlier this week and is the first to show up on American soil without being directly traceable to the person affected having any contact with a country or person known to already have it.

As of Thursday, health officials had no idea how the person contracted the illness

The spread of this particular strain of coronavirus has taken whole nations off-guard, and some health officials here in the United States as well. Dr. Melissa Nolan, an epidemiologist at the University of South Carolina, says she did not think COVID-19 would have turned into a global pandemic. But she remains confident that if South Carolina eventually reports cases of the illness (so far, there have been none reported here), the state will be able to handle it.

Coronavirus Scare You? Flu Should Scare You More

Feb 4, 2020
CDC

Health officials around the world are scrambling to stay ahead of the coronavirus outbreak plaguing parts of China. But Dr. Melissa Nolan, an infectious disease specialist at the University of South Carolina, says influenza is a far bigger cause for concern.

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