coronavirus

Graphic of the U. S. Capitol building
Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Tuesday, May 12, 10:00 a.m. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee is hearing from leaders of the Trump administration's coronavirus response about safely reopening the country. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health and Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are among those testifying. Watch the proceedings live.

File photo of the S.C. Senate in session
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

This year’s session of the SC General Assembly was interrupted by the coronavirus outbreak back in March before lawmakers were able to approve next year’s state operating budget.

So, they plan to return to Columbia for a couple of days this week to pass a resolution to continue the current year’s budget beyond the end of the state fiscal year on June 30th.

Legislative leaders hope to meet again in September to enact a new budget.  By then they should have a better idea of just how much of an impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the state’s economy.

Dr. Rachel Zweigoron
Bobbi Conner/MUSC

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Rachael Zweigoron about some positive strategies for dealing with the daily ups and downs of parenting during the pandemic.  Dr. Zweigoran is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and a Pediatrician at MUSC Children’s Health.

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for May 9, 2020, we preview what lawmakers will be doing when they return to the state house next week, discuss safeguarding state primaries in June, and travel to Pendleton, SC, as Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) visits a textile plant to share his plan to reshore medical supply jobs.

In 2002, our next guest worked as the tourism development coordinator for Ontario, Canada. His main project was to get the hospitality industry back on track after the SARS virus derailed tourism in the province.  He’s now in our state, in the same industry, working with students at one of our major colleges in the Lowcountry.

Mike Switzer interviews Wayne Smith, chair of the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management in the School of Business at the College of Charleston.

51 year-old Chris Varner of Anderson found love late in life.  He's been married to Gay Stanley for nearly a year.  They've spent much of their time together, apart.  He worries he may never see her again.

"I honestly believe it would be the end of her if she catches it," says Varner.

His 48 year-old spouse is vulnerable to the coronavirus.  She has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD.  It's a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe.

For 60 years, our next guest’s faith-based nonprofit has been providing retirement living options, including assisted living and skilled nursing care for people across the state.  It’s a challenging business to begin with, and then came the coronavirus.

Mike Switzer interviews Dr. Franklin Fant, the current director of foundation services and church relations at Presbyterian Communities of South Carolina in Columbia, who is also currently transitioning to become their next CEO.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) and CareSouth partnered to host free COVID-19 testing in Society Hill, SC, on Tuesday, May 5, 2020.
Gavin Jackson/SCETV

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for May 7, 2020, we take you to a recent free COVID-19 testing site in the Pee Dee, recap the findings of a recent survey of South Carolina businesses, look at how the expansion of broadband access is gaining traction with lawmakers, and more.

Dr. Donald J. Schepker
University of S.C.

As the economic shutdown/reopening has occurred and will continue to occur in phases, many companies are still in a state of shock and struggling to identify and grab a hold of these transitional stages in order to prepare to successfully exit this crisis.

Dr. Angela LaRosa
MUSC

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. Angela LaRosa about routines and structure to help kids with ADHD during the stay-at-home restrictions and remote learning due to the pandemic. Dr. LaRosa is a Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and she’s Medical Director of the Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic at MUSC Children’s Health.

By now, many people are aware of two things involving the nonprofit sector: they have been hit particularly hard by the global pandemic and today is their annual online giving day, when they raise millions of dollars enabling them to continue to do the good work they do.

Mike Switzer interviews JoAnn Turnquist, president and CEO of Central Carolina Community Foundation, the host of today’s event entitled Midlands Gives

Gavin Jackson (with A.T. Shire in insert) records from his home office on Monday, May 4, 2020.
South Carolina Public Radio

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede for May, 5, 2020, we examine the latest COVID-19 numbers in the state as Gov. Henry McMaster's "work or home" order is lifted this week. We also look at Rep. James Clyburn's plan for affordable broadband internet access, speak with South Carolina Small Business Chamber of Commerce CEO Frank Knapp about how businesses are faring, and more.

Palmetto Animal Assisted Life Services during 2019 Midlands Gives Event. The nonprofit has furloughed more than half its staff due to Covid-19.
Flock and Rally

According to a recent survey by the South Carolina Community Loan fund, many nonprofits say they will run out of funding by June; 80 percent indicated they will be out money by September.

Elizabeth Houck works with Midlands Gives, an 18-hour online giving event powered by the Central Carolina Community Foundation. For the past six years, the event has raised almost 10 million dollars for local nonprofits. Houck said this year’s event, in the midst of a pandemic, the need to give organizations is even greater.

Dr. John Wrangle
MUSC

This week Bobbi Conner talks with Dr. John Wrangle about MUSC’s participation in a convalescent plasma program to help treat critically ill COVID-19 patients. Dr. Wrangle is an Assistant Professor of Hematology and Oncology and an Oncologist at Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC.

When economists lay out their forecasts for all to see, they usually add a caveat such as “barring any unforeseen circumstances”.  The COVID-19 global pandemic has certainly turned out to be one of those circumstances that has derailed all forecasts made prior to this virus rearing its ugly head.

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