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Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee at 2:30pm ET today, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election. Sessions is expected to take questions about his recusal from the Russia investigation, his own meetings with Russian officials, and what if anything he knew about a private Oval Office meeting between President Trump and fired FBI Director James Comey.

When I first heard the news after midnight Thursday that a sniper had killed police officers in Dallas, my first thought was, "Oh, no."

"Oh, no" for the officers and their families, for those trying to peacefully protest recent police shootings. But that "Oh, no" was also for what could come next and a fear for our country, for race relations, for an American people in the midst of a dark presidential campaign that is threatening to tear at the seams of the fabric of our quilted country.

The name of the suspected gunman killed in Dallas is Micah Xavier Johnson, two federal law enforcement officials briefed on the investigation tell NPR.

United States and South Korean defense forces announced an advanced missile defense system to be used in the instance of attack from North Korea. The move quickly drew criticism from nearby China, which maintains relationships with the North.

I have lived in eight countries and 10 cities. I have never lived anywhere for longer than six years. But the one constant in my life, my anchor in a changing world, my defense against perpetual culture shock, is my pot of daal.

Daal -- yellow, red, brown or black — is a staple across India. It is often described, inadequately, I think, as lentil soup. Except it's so much more.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to turn now to NPR's John Burnett because he is out on the streets of Dallas getting the mood this morning on a grim Friday morning. John, what are you seeing? Where are you?

JOHN BURNETT, BYLINE: Hey, Rachel. I'm actually sitting outside of a steakhouse on the edge of the police cordon area - a 20, 25 block area. South downtown Dallas, which has just turned into this giant crime scene - it's cop land. There's state troopers. There's Dallas police. There's fire and rescue. There's ATF agents.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's talk now to the Reverend Michael W. Waters, founder and senior pastor of Joy Tabernacle A.M.E. Church in Dallas, Texas. He was at the march last night in downtown Dallas. Reverend, thanks for coming on this morning. We appreciate it.

All five of those killed Thursday night at the Dallas protest were law enforcement officers — four of whom served with the Dallas Police Department, and a fifth who worked for Dallas Area Rapid Transit, or DART. That DART officer has been identified by the department as Brent Thompson.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we begin this morning with grim news out of Dallas. At least five police officers are dead and at least seven wounded after snipers opened fire during a demonstration in the city's downtown. Two civilians were also wounded in the attack.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Labor Department has released its monthly jobs figures, and there's a glimmer of positive economic news because June hiring experienced a pretty strong rebound. The department says 287,000 jobs were added to the economy last month. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports that the bigger-than-expected number reversed a pretty dismal showing in the month prior.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: June's report is an indication that all the fretting about the previous months' low hiring figures was much ado about nothing.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Code Switch is covering the deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile and several police officers in Dallas. Here's where to find us, and how to contribute to our reporting.

We'll be following this story closely on social media; you can find us on Twitter at @NPRCodeSwitch.

When a goat gazes into your eyes, it may be issuing a silent plea for help.

That's the suggestion from a new study of goats co-authored by Christian Nawroth, who researches animal cognition at Queen Mary University of London, published in Biology Letters.

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