A Minute with Miles

All Stations: Mon-Fri, 6:43 am and 8:43 am

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you “reach” a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why—and how do you pronounce “Handel”? These and countless other classical music questions are answered on South Carolina Public Radio’s A Minute with Miles. Hosted by longtime NPR commentator Miles Hoffman, the segments inform and entertain as they provide illuminating 60-second flights through the world of classical music. 

The Organ- 1

Feb 16, 2015

In this part one of a two part series, Miles Hoffman talks about the history of the organ.

A Minute with Miles - a production of ETV Radio made possible by the JM Smith Corporation.

Romeo & Juliet

Feb 13, 2015

Host Miles Hoffman discusses the different variations on the story of Romeo and Juliet on this Valentine's Day themed Minute with Miles.

A Minute with Miles- a production of ETV Radio, made possible by the JM Smith Foundation.

The Trumpet

Feb 12, 2015

The Trumpet is the highest pitched and most brilliant member of the brass family.  Miles Hoffman discusses the history of the trumpet.

A Minute with Miles- a production of ETV Radio, made possible by the JM Smith Foundation.

Concertmaster

Feb 11, 2015

The Concertmaster is the violinist who occupies the first chair of the first violin section of an orchestra.  Miles Hoffman explains.

A Minute with Miles- a production of ETV Radio, made possible by the JM Smith Foundation.

Second Violin

Feb 10, 2015

The Second Violin part in classical music is an individual line that forms part of the fabric of a piece.  Miles Hoffman talks about the history of the Second Violin.

A Minute with Miles- a production of ETV Radio, made possible by the JM Smith Foundation.

Lute

Feb 9, 2015

Host Miles Hoffman discusses the history of the Lute, a plucked string instrument which is held and played very much like a guitar.

A Minute with Miles- a production of ETV Radio, made possible by the JM Smith Foundation.

Guitar

Feb 6, 2015

Host Miles Hoffman discusses the origins of the Classical Guitar.

A Minute with Miles - a production of ETV Radio made possible by the JM Smith Corporation.

Celesta

Feb 5, 2015

The sound of the celesta, in the dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker is familiar to almost everyone.  The evolutionary origins of many instruments are lost in the mists of history, but not so with the celesta.

Divertimento

Feb 4, 2015

Divertimento, in Italian, means “entertainment,” or “diversion.”  Although composers in the latter part of the eighteenth century used the term as a title for instrumental pieces whose primary purpose was to be light, pleasant, and entertaining, great composers like Haydn and Mozart sometimes just couldn’t help themselves, and wrote divertimentos of great beauty and depth.

Dances

Feb 3, 2015

For centuries, composers have borrowed dance forms.  Dances provide rhythmic vitality, and they offer ready-made, concrete associations, associations with specific moods, feelings, functions or types of physical movement, or with peoples, nations, or cultures.

An die Musik

Feb 2, 2015

Today, let’s just take a moment to listen to Franz Schubert’s beautiful thank-you note to music: An die Musik, sung by Fritz Wunderlich.
A Minute with Miles - a production of ETV Radio made possible by the JM Smith Corporation.

Finale

Jan 15, 2015

Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the finales of instrumental pieces were almost always in fast tempos.  Composers felt it was important to leave the audience feeling enthusiastic and uplifted, so they also tended to end their pieces with a bang – or at least with some sort of satisfyingly emphatic musical statement.

Metronome

Jan 14, 2015

In 1816, an Austrian by the name of Johann Nepomuk Maelzel set up a factory in Paris and began manufacturing a clever new mechanical device that he called a metronome.

Obligato

Jan 13, 2015

Obbligato is an Italian word meaning “essential,” or “obligatory.” During the Baroque era, but even as late as Beethoven’s time, composers used the term obbligato to describe instruments or instrumental parts that were essential to a composition.

Oratorio

Jan 12, 2015

The oratorio is a musical form with the unusual distinction of being named for… a building. In the 1550's in Rome, a priest named Filippo Neri organized a series of religious gatherings that included performances of sacred stories with music.

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