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Fighting on Two Fronts: Black South Carolinians in World War I

Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.
Library of Congress
/
Unidentified African American soldier in uniform with marksmanship qualification badge and campaign hat, with cigarette holder in front of painted backdrop.

Upon the United States' entrance into World War I, President Woodrow Wilson told the nation that the war was being fought to "make the world safe for democracy." For many African-American South Carolinians, the chance to fight in this war was a way to prove their citizenship, in hopes of changing things for the better at home.

Dr. Janet Hudson from the University of South Carolina joins Dr. Edgar for a public Conversation on Black South Carolinian in World War I. The conversation took place at USC’s Capstone Conference Center, in Columbia, on January 30, 2018. It was part of a series presented in January and February, 2018, and sponsored by the USC College of Arts and Sciences.

- Originally broadcast 02/23/18 - 

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Dr. Walter Edgar has two programs on South Carolina Public Radio: Walter Edgar's Journal, and South Carolina from A to Z. Dr. Edgar received his B.A. degree from Davidson College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in 1969. After two years in the army (including a tour of duty in Vietnam), he returned to USC as a post-doctoral fellow of the National Archives, assigned to the Papers of Henry Laurens.