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  • The South Carolina Supreme Court has ruled a state law preventing anyone from moving a Confederate monument or changing the historical name of a street or building without the Legislature's permission is legal. But in the same ruling Wednesday, the justices struck down a requirement that two-thirds of the General Assembly must approve a move or name change. The ruling keeps intact South Carolina's Heritage Act. The 2000 law has prevented colleges and local governments from removing Confederate monuments or the names of segregationists from buildings. Lawmakers have refused to even take up any requests to remove monuments over the past few years even as other Southern cities act.
  • Health care workers and educators in South Carolina are doubling down on calls for lawmakers to roll back a provision that bans masks in schools. Pediatricians, school nurses and teachers on Tuesday described the toll the coronavirus pandemic is taking on students and in children's hospitals. They want lawmakers to repeal a state rule that prevents school districts from using state money to enforce a rule requiring masks. More than 88,000 students and staff have been quarantined this school year so far. Schools have recorded nearly 21,000 COVID-19 cases this fall, almost 7,000 more than they counted all of last year.
  • The Tropical Atlantic has had no shortage of tropical storms in recent days, but they have been weak so far. That may change with a tropical wave, called "Invest 98L" in a few days.
  • Today, at 3:21 p.m. EDT, is the Fall Equinox.
  • Today, at 3:21 p.m. EDT, is the Fall Equinox.
  • “P” is for Parish, Margaret Cecile (1927-1988). Author.
  • “P” is for Parish, Margaret Cecile (1927-1988). Author.
  • The pandemic brought many changes to our business community including positive ones. For example, in the gardening industry, some retailers saw as much as a 300 percent increase in their business. Bonnie Plants, the nation’s largest grower of plants for home gardens, estimated there were 20 million new gardeners in 2020. Our next guest has been right in the middle of that trend.Mike Switzer interviews Wally Steinhauser, co-owner of Wingard’s Market, in Lexington, SC.
  • The pandemic brought many changes to our business community including positive ones. For example, in the gardening industry, some retailers saw as much as a 300 percent increase in their business. Bonnie Plants, the nation’s largest grower of plants for home gardens, estimated there were 20 million new gardeners in 2020. Our next guest has been right in the middle of that trend.Mike Switzer interviews Wally Steinhauser, co-owner of Wingard’s Market, in Lexington, SC.
  • The Coronavirus pandemic has changed many aspects of daily life, including how people work, attend school and socialize. The virus, which has claimed almost 12,000 lives in South Carolina, is also having an impact on how many people mourn their dead. Within the African-American community, instead of observing days of culture-rich traditions, many families have settled for a scaled-back graveside service to celebrate the life of a loved-one.