journalism

Cokie Roberts
1997 ABC, Inc Steve Fenn

Veteran journalist Cokie Roberts has died at age 75.  Roberts joined NPR in 1978, the start of a remarkable career that led her to ABC News in 1988, though she remained on NPR as a commentator until her death. Roberts died Tuesday due to complications from breast cancer, according to a family statement.

Walter Edgar interviewed Roberts during a 2004 book tour promoting her book, Founding Mothers, when she made a stop at Litchfield Books. 

From her Camden home, Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker can monitor the goings-on around the world by flipping through the TV news channels and keeping an eye glued to her Post, which she reads daily along with the Wall Street Journal and New York Times.  Parker is one of the most widely-syndicated columnists in America, read in more than 400 media outlets twice a week.  Like her colleagues, she started as a newspaper reporter – in her case, in Charleston – and moved through the ranks of various papers until an editor realized she had a voice “and I have difficulty keeping my voice

Robert Cox (with Maria Hinojosa, WGBH, Boston)
Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One, WGBH, Boston

(Originally broadcast 01/19/18) - The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

USC/Thomas Cooper Library

(Originally broadcast 12/08/17) - In spite of a growing movement for journalistic neutrality in reporting the news of the 20th century, journalists enlisted on both sides of the mid-century struggle for civil rights. Indeed, against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in South Carolina with newspaperman John McCray and his allies at the Lighthouse and Informer, who challenged readers to "rebel and fight"--to reject the "slavery of thought and action" and become "progressive fighters" for equality.

The distinctive white shawl protest graffiti of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo makes its mark in Bariloche's central square.
McKay Savage [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

The Buenos Aires Herald ceased publication in July of 2017, almost 141 years after its founding. The paper became famous, however, only in the latter part of the 20th century, for exposing the forced disappearances of Argentinians during the 1976-83 military dictatorship. Other newspapers in the country whitewashed this chapter of Argentina’s history.

Frank Kearns
WVU Press

(Originally broadcast 09/08/17) - Columbian Gerald Davis is co-producer of the 2012 Emmy-winning documentary Frank Kearns: American Correspondent first aired on West Virginia Public Television. Recently, Davis has published Algerian Diary: Frank Kearns and the "Impossible Assignment" for CBS News (2016, WVU Press). He talks with Walter Edgar about his deep dive into Kearns’ life and the assignment that changed the way the U.S. viewed Algeria’s fight for independence from France.

USC/Thomas Cooper Library

In spite of a growing movement for journalistic neutrality in reporting the news of the 20th century, journalists enlisted on both sides of the mid-century struggle for civil rights. Indeed, against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in South Carolina with newspaperman John McCray and his allies at the Lighthouse and Informer, who challenged readers to "rebel and fight"--to reject the "slavery of thought and action" and become "progressive fighters" for equality.

Frank Kearns
WVU Press

Columbian Gerald Davis is co-producer of the 2012 Emmy-winning documentary Frank Kearns: American Correspondent first aired on West Virginia Public Television. Recently, Davis has published Algerian Diary: Frank Kearns and the "Impossible Assignment" for CBS News (2016, WVU Press). He talks with Walter Edgar about his deep dive into Kearns’ life and the assignment that changed the way the U.S. viewed Algeria’s fight for independence from France.

LeeAnn Ledgerwood on Piano Jazz

Jun 12, 2017

Pianist LeeAnn Ledgerwood studied at the Berkley College of Music alongside fellow musicians Branford Marsalis and Terrence Blanchard. She became a protégée of Marian McPartland, who encouraged her to pursue a career in jazz. She was McPartland’s guest on Piano Jazz in 1990. In this session Ledgerwood shows off her keen sense of style with "I Want to Talk about You." McPartland joins in for a duo version of "Broadway."

News Stations: Sat, June 17, 8 pm | Classical Station: Sun, June 18, 7 pm

Lynda O'Bryon
SCETV

In 1971, Linda O'Bryon started her first broadcast journalism job. During a recent Story Corp conversation in Columbia, O'Bryon talked about the barriers that blocked many paths for women, during that time.

In this edition of Narrative, O'Bryon (now President and CEO of SC ETV and SC Public Radio) shares how her career included opportunities to break some of those barriers. 

How a Conversation With Warren Buffett Led to A Memorable Story

Cokie Roberts, Author and political commentator
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Cokie Roberts is an author and political commentator for ABC News and NPR. Recently, she spent time at two Columbia-area schools to share her new book with students. In Ladies of Liberty, The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, Roberts uses the letters and journals of women to give another perspective of what was happening during the early years of the nation. 

In this edition of Narrative, Roberts shares how she selected the women featured in her book.

StoryCorps: White House Correspondents

Nov 23, 2016
StoryCorps

At StoryCorps recording booths across the country, friends and loved ones interview each other about their lives. Here Susanne Schafer and her husband Charles Bierbauer speak about their careers as journalists and their time as White House correspondents during the Reagan administration. A pioneer in her field, in 1989 Susanne Schafer became the first female Associated Press correspondent covering the Pentagon.

StoryCorps will be recording in Columbia from November 17 to December 19.

Journalist Jim Hoagland
SCETV

  In December of 2015, the Pulitzer Prize Board awarded a grant to Humanities SC for From the Jazz Age to the Digital Age: Pulitzer Prize Winners in South Carolina, a program to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Prizes in 2016 through Pulitzer’s Campfires Initiative. Humanities SC has partnered with SCETV to produce three, 30-minute TV programs spotlighting the state’s Pulitzer winners, hosted by Charles Bierbauer, Dean of the USC College of Information and Communication.

  “H” is for Hoagland, Jimmie Lee [b. 1940]. Journalist. A two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, Hoagland was born in Rock Hill. He graduated from USC in 1961 with a degree in journalism. He worked briefly as a sports writer for The State and the Columbia Record before winning a scholarship to study in France. After serving in the Air Force, he worked as a copy editor for the international edition of the New York Times. In 1966 he joined the Washington Post and in 1969 became their correspondent in Africa. He won his first Pulitzer in 1971 for his reporting on apartheid in Africa.