SC News

News stories and interviews South Carolina Public Radio.

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Gavin Jackson/SCETV

This edition of the South Carolina Lede for February 23, 2021, features: a look at the national abortion debate and what the future may hold for South Carolina's now-blocked "fetal heartbeat" law; information about a new rental and mortgage assistance program available in the state; the importance of self-care during the pandemic; and more.

Photo of the music for "Lift Every Voice and Sing"
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

The song "Lift Every Voice and Sing" has long been regarded within the African-American community as the Black national anthem. Its lyrics reflect a life of struggle, but also perseverance and faith. Many, like Army veteran Harrison Jenkins, first learned the song in church and/ or grade school.  By the time time he was in highschool, the Berkeley County native was singing the song as a member of the school's chorus- where it was mandatory to learn the song in its entirety.

Gavin Jackson/SCETV

This edition of the South Carolina Lede for February 20, 2021, features an in-depth look at the journey taken by the so-called "fetal heartbeat" abortion bill from the state legislature to Gov. Henry McMaster's desk for his signature this week — as well as the temporary block a federal judge placed on the new law just one day after its passage.

Lowcountry Principal Shines in the National Spotlight

Feb 19, 2021
Principal Henry Darby in the halls of North Charleston High School
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

It's almost midnight and Henry Darby is stocking shelves at a Walmart in North Charleston.  He zips down the aisles unraveling cans from plastic packaging, eyeing them like a puzzle and then putting them in just the right place.

He lives the advice his family gave him growing up in this community.

"They always taught me whatever your hands find to do, do it."

Darby has found something to do alright.

De-escalating Disability explores the intersectionality of autism, race, policing.

On this episode, we hear what one mother is telling her son with Autism Spectrum Disorder about interacting with police and how she feels officers aren't prepared enough to handle such a situation without it possibly turning into a tragedy.

With their distinctive makeup and and personas and wild stage shows, few rock bands are as recognizable as KISS.  The group has attracted legions of fans over the last half-century.  John Downs of Charleston took his interest a step beyond fandom, and has amassed a collection of hundreds of items since 1977.  

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

For ways you can help, scroll down to the bottom of this story.

On the upside, South Carolina is a bounteous food state. We grow almost 5 million acres worth of food on 25,000 farms and have excellent trade partnerships with food growers in other states. There is no shortage of fresh and healthy food available.

Two caveats: The abundance of food also includes an abundance of junk, and while there is plenty of healthy food, there also is a shortage of people who can access it.

Roper St. Francis Healthcare

This edition of the South Carolina Lede for February 16, 2021, features: a look at the latest COVID-19 numbers and vaccination efforts across the state; a discussion of the importance of Black history with Dr. Bobby Donaldson, professor of history and director of the Center for Civil Rights History and Research at the University of South Carolina; an update on the state of South Carolina's economy; and much more.

Prisma Health

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for February 13, 2021 features: an update from State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman on vaccination plans for teachers; a recap of all of the activity at the state house this week; updates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on double masking and COVID-19 vaccine dosage schedules; and much more.

 S.C. House Judiciary Committee meeting on Tuesday Feb.9, 2021
SCETV

When state lawmakers return to Columbia next week the House of Representatives is expected to debate the Fetal Heartbeat Abortion bill.  The measure, which has already been approved by the Senate, would forbid doctors from performing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected usually around the sixth week of pregnancy.

The bill is expected to have little trouble passing in the Republican controlled House.  Similar bills have passed in previous years.

The bill could be signed into law by Governor McMaster as early as next week.

De-escalating Disability explores the intersectionality of autism, race, policing.

On this second installment, we speak with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) specialist Dr. Laura Carpenter of the Medical University of South Carolina about the fundamentals of ASD as well as her research into the interaction between people with disabilities and the criminal justice system.

SCDHEC

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for February 9, 2021, features: a look at the ongoing debate over vaccinating teachers vs. older South Carolinians; an update on the state's economic recovery; insights into what DHEC is doing to reach vulnerable and underserved communities; and more.

We want to hear from you! Leave us a 1-minute long voicemail at 803-563-7169 to tell us how you’re coping with COVID-19, what your life is like in quarantine, and what are you watching, reading, and doing during this time of social distancing.

This episode of the South Carolina Lede for February 6, 2021, features: a look at the battle between Gov. Henry McMaster and state lawmakers over when teachers should be vaccinated; an update on the state of South Carolina's economy; hear how vaccination efforts are going in the Lowcountry; and more.

We want to hear from you! Leave us a 1-minute long voicemail at 803-563-7169 to tell us how you’re coping with COVID-19, what your life is like in quarantine, and what are you watching, reading, and doing during this time of social distancing.

Seniors move with ease through a drive-up Covid vaccination site in the Seacoast Church parking lot of Mount Pleasant.

Pharmacists huddle beneath tents, drawing every drop of the Pfizer vaccine from tiny vials as they load syringes.  Nearby, nurses cheerfully greet seniors as they pull up in cars and quickly get much needed shots into eager arms.


The Promise

A class-action lawsuit filed Wednesday against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston and others alleges "egregious acts" at Bishop England High School, a school the diocese runs.

The Allegations

The suit says for two decades Bishop England students were required to get undressed in school lockers rooms that left them "subject to viewing" through large, glass windows.  The Catholic high school was built on Daniel Island in 1998 after moving from downtown Charleston.

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