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Greenville County Lets The Floodplains Flood

Oct 20, 2016
Cooper McKim

The light brown wooden wall cabinets, drawers, stove and oven in the kitchen at the Greenville County building are hand-me-downs. The kitchen supplies came from homes the county bought and then demolished.

“If we bought a house and there is something in there that we paid for that can be used and recycled then let's do it.” Assistant County Administrator Paula Gucker said. “Because then I don't have to go out and buy cabinets or countertops.”

South Carolina state agencies, local governments and non-profit organizations in 18 counties are now eligible through FEMA to recoup costs associated with infrastructure damage caused by Hurricane Matthew.

City of Columbia Police Officers Erskin Moody (left) and Ivan Birochak.
Jennifer Timmons/City of Columbia Police Department

Sergeant Erskine Moody and Officer Ivan Birochak of the Columbia Police Department were assigned to a twelve hour night shift on October 3 and 4, 2015. They wondered whether the forecasted rain would "live up to the hype," and soon realized that it would. From managing barricades to saving families from their homes, a normal shift quickly became one to remember. 

Author Pat Conroy in 2013, talking with students about their entries in USC’s annual high school writing contest.
Courtesy Aida Rogers, USC Honors College.

The University of South Carolina’s honors college sponsors a writing contest each year to encourage students to write, and to get readers for these talented young people, according to college Dean Steve Lynn, who originated the program.  The incentives to enter are several.  Not only does it award cash prizes, but the best writings are gathered together each year in a book published by USC Press to give permanent exposure to young writers.   In addition, the judges are high-profile, nationally known writers. 

Caterpillars of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly.
Galukalock, via Wikimedia Commons

The caterpillars for the Black Swallowtail Butterfly love to feed on members of the carrot, parsley, and fennel families.

Residents in Marion and Orangeburg counties who were impacted by Hurricane Matthew are now eligible for the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Individual Assistance program. 

Survivors who sustained losses in these two designated counties can apply for federal assistance by registering online at DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 800-621-3362

Members of the Forest Acres Community gather at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Columbia for an Interfaith Service of Remembrance.
Laura Hunsberger

On the anniversary of last October's historic floods, the sanctuary of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church was full of people gathered for an interfaith service of remembrance. Leaders from 10 churches and synagogues took part, offering prayers, songs, and words of encouragement. The event honored First Responders from Forest Acres, Richland County, and the City of Columbia, along with community members touched by the disaster. South Carolina Public Radio’s Laura Hunsberger has the story.

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Pee Dee area residents, particularly those in hard-hit counties such as Marion, Marlboro, Dillon and Florence, should not wade or play in floodwaters resulting from Hurricane Matthew.

Gov. Haley Thursday afternoon press conference
Russ McKinney / SC Public Radio

In her fourth press conference since Hurricane Matthew made landfall in South Carolina, Gov. Nikki Haley said more counties could be included in the Emergency Declaration recently declared by President Obama. The Governor and her team also gave updates on fatalities; road and bridge conditions; shelters; power outages and more.

Residents of Nichols being evacuated by boat
Courtesy of Courtney Wilds (Nichols Resident)

Many South Carolinians may not have heard of the town of Nichols prior to Gov. Nikki Haley's October 10th press conference. The small town is in Marion County and has a population of about 400.  Those watching that update, learned that more than half of the town's residents were rescued from the third floor of the town hall. Nichols was flooded from rising waters from the neighboring Lumber River. South Carolina Public Radio's Thelisha Eaddy talks with a resident about how he and his family were taken to higher ground.

One SC Fund Expands to Help Hurricane Matthew Victims

Oct 13, 2016
Thelisha Eaddy / SC Public Radio

The One SC Fund was created after the October 2015 rain event and flood and has distributed $2 million dollars to nonprofits to help residents rebuild and recovery from that historic event. Governor Haley said the fund will now expand to help victims of Hurricane Matthew.

“What we’ve found very, very helpful was we started the One SC Fund last year, and what that did was allowed neighbors to help neighbors, businesses who wanted to contribute to the state to help those in need,” Haley said.

Copyright 2019 South Carolina Public Radio. To see more, visit South Carolina Public Radio.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The South Carolina Emergency Division advises residents who are continuing to recover from Hurricane Matthew to call 2-1-1 for any assistance, if their needs for food, clothing and shelter are not being met. Callers will be connected to local relief supplies where available.

As recovery efforts begin, local governments and state agencies continue assessment of damages caused by Hurricane Matthew.

In response to Governor Nikki Haley’s request, President Barack Obama declared a major disaster exists in the State of South Carolina and ordered Federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in 13 counties most severely affected by Hurricane Matthew.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency Public Assistance Program helps reimburse local governments, state agencies, eligible private non-profit organizations and electric co-operatives for certain expenses they have incurred. Federal disaster aid is not available for individual residents at this time.

SCETV.ORG

During her Tuesday afternoon press conference, Governor Haley said parts of Marion County are under four feet of water and flooding conditions could continue for the next one to two weeks. The Governor and members of her team also gave update reports on impacted rivers; road and bridge conditions; water rescues; breached dams; and shelter capacity.

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