SC News

News stories and interviews South Carolina Public Radio.

Ways to Connect

Roots Musik Karamu Celebrates 40 Years

Apr 19, 2019
Osei Chanderl Celbrating 40 Years as host of Roots Musik Karamu
South Carolina Public Radio

When Osei Chandler’s wife Saadeka wanted to move from Brooklyn in 1977 closer to her home in Summerville,  SC, the now reggae music show host couldn’t say no.  He was smitten.

“I remember the first time we met,” he said. “She was like six feet tall, with a mini skirt and afro. I was toast,” he laughs.

Looking back, next to his marriage and kids, moving  was one of the best things he ever did.

“I couldn’t be on the radio in Brooklyn," said Chandler. " I'd be too busy hustling, trying to get to work. I’d probably have to have two or three jobs."

Sen. Chip Campsen (R-Charleston) flanked by Gov. Henry McMaster and a bi-partisan group of State Senators pushing to preempt off-shore drilling for oil and gas along the South Carolina coast.
Russ McKinney/SC Public Radio

Budget Also Contains Off-Shore Oil Prohibition

The S.C. General Assembly passes hundreds of bills and resolutions each year, but the most important measure enacted by the legislature is the annual State Appropriations Bill.  That’s the state’s operating budget for the next fiscal year which begins on July 1.  Not only does the budget provide the funding for state government to operate, it also identifies the priority needs of the state.

Lt. Col. James Doolittle and his crew on the USS Hornet April 1942. From left: Lt. Henry Potter, navigator; Lt. Col. James Doolittle, pilot; Staff Sgt. Fred Braemer, bombardier; Lt. Richard Cole, co-pilot; and Staff Sgt. Paul Leonard, engineer/gunner.
Joint Base San Antonio

77 years ago (April 18, 1942), 80 brave men did what had never been attempted: they flew 16 army B-25B Mitchell bombers off a U.S.

Former Vice President Joe Biden touches the casket of former South Carolina governor and long time U.S. Senator Ernest "Fritz" Hollings
The Citadel

It was one of those rare Charleston days with no humidity, only blue skies and a slight  breeze.  Rare indeed, like the Charleston native being remembered as a, “one of a kind statesman”.

The funeral of former South Carolina governor and six term U.S. Senator Ernest “Fritz” Hollings brought him back, near the neighborhood where he grew up and the school he held so dear, his Alma mater, The Citadel.

“He talked about The Citadel like it was in a literal sense, his citadel,” said former Vice President Joe Biden.  It meant, “Everything to him.”

Graphic for the funeral services of the Honorable Ernest Frederick "Fritz" Hollings.
SCETV

Watch a live, video stream of funeral coverage begins at 11:00 a.m.

Senator Ernest "Fritz" Hollings (1922-2019) was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1922. He graduated from The Citadel in 1942 and served as an artillery officer in World War Two. After the war, he was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives. In 1958, at age 36, he was elected Governor. In 1966, Hollings became a U.S. Senator, an office he would hold for nearly 40 years. In 2003, Hollings retired from political service. The former senator died at the age of 97 on April 6, 2019.

Civil Rights Movement Had its Roots in World War I

Apr 16, 2019
Some of the men of the 369th (15th N.Y.) who won the Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action, sailing home on The Stockholm in 1919. Front row, left to right: Private Eagle Eye, Ed Williams; Lamp Light, Herbert Tayl.
Source: International Film Service. The National Archives.

As soldiers were fighting overseas during World War I, there was another battle going on back home:  the battle for a better life for African Americans.  Historian Janet Hudson, speaking at a recent symposium on the war presented by Lander University in Greenwood, said even as they chafed under segregation and Jim Crow laws designed to keep them back socially and policially, black leaders saw the war as an opportunity to earn their rights by cooperating with white leaders and supporting the war through volunteering to fight, raising money and other means.

On this special episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson looks back on the life and career of former South Carolina Governor and U.S. Senator Ernest "Fritz" Hollings, who passed away on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at the age of 97.

The South Carolina State House
File

State lawmakers are in the final month of this year’s legislative session with most of this year's priority bills still being debated.

This week, a Senate sub-committee opted to hold until next year's session a controversial portion of the massive school improvement bill in hopes of securing passage of the remainder of the bill this year.  The bill which has already passed in the House of Representatives is viewed as the most important matter for the legislature this session.

The Good Samaritan-Waverly Hospital has been closed since 1973. The building is now owned by Allen University and is scheduled for a massive renovation and projected ribbon cutting in the Fall of 2020.
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

In 1944, Columbia resident and civil rights activist Modjeska Monteith Simkins was put in charge of raising money for the construction of a new hospital to primarily serve the African American population of the Midlands. While completing this task, she wrote:

“It is our grand privilege and our duty; yours and mine; to help build and equip ourselves with a modern hospital owned and operated by Negroes.”

Symposium Examines Women's Roles During World War I

Apr 9, 2019
From The Electrical Experimenter, October, 1916. The original caption reads: "Here Are Some of the Patriotic Young Women Studying Radio-telegraphy At One of the Summer Preparedness Camps."
Public Domain

Lander University recented hosted a symposium on World War I, which ended just over a century ago.  The symposium drew scholars and authors primarily from the Southeast to discuss various aspects of the war, which then was known as "The Great War."  One aspect covered by a panel of experts examined the role of women during the war.

Gavin Jackson speaks with Russ McKinney (l) and Jeffrey Collins (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, April 8, 2019.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

The end of the legislative session is one month away, which means this week is "crossover week." That's an insider way of saying if a bill hasn't been passed out of its originating chamber -- either the State House or Senate -- by the end of the day Wednesday, that legislation is not likely to go anywhere this year without a supermajority vote.

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson discusses a number of the bills still up in the air (including controversial ones dealing with medical marijuana, outlawing plastic bags, and abortion) with the Associated Press' Jeffrey Collins and South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney.

UPDATE 3 PM MONDAY

A file photo of the late Sen. Ernest "Fritz" Hollings.
U.S. Congress

Former S.C. Governor and U.S. Senator Ernest "Fritz" Hollings died on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at the age of 97.  A Democrat, he held elective office for over fifty years.

South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney has this look back at Hollings's life and political career.

Fewer hurricanes are expected this year than the last two seasons, according to renowned researcher Dr. Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University. However, both of those seasons far outperformed expectations.

Even Phil doesn't have much confidence in his forecast this time of year.

“So our skill in April is modest, and that's because the hurricane season doesn't start until June and then doesn't ramp up until August. So obviously there's a lot that could change in the atmosphere and ocean,” he says.

The South Carolina State House
File

This year’s attempt by pro-life members of the state legislature to pass restrictions on abortions is centered in the House of Representatives.  A bill that would ban almost all abortions if a fetal heartbeat is detected in a woman passed the House Judiciary Committee this week on a mostly party line vote. Experts say a fetal heartbeat can typically be detected around the sixth week of pregnancy.

Pages