A 1903 photograph of family and relatives of Noah Benenhaley (1860-1939) and his wife, Rosa Benenhaley (1857-1937), both descendants of Joseph Benenhaley.
Courtesy of the Greg Thompson Collection

South Carolina’s Turkish People

(Originally broadcast 11/30/18) - Despite its reputation as a melting pot of ethnicities and races, the United States has a well-documented history of immigrants who have struggled through isolation, segregation, discrimination, oppression, and assimilation. South Carolina is home to one such group—known historically and derisively as “the Turks”—which can trace its oral history back to Joseph Benenhaley, an Ottoman refugee from Old World conflict. According to its traditional narrative,...

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For the past month, NPR's Emily Harris has covered the intense Israeli-Palestinian fighting from the Gaza Strip.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered a ban on some food and agricultural imports from countries that have imposed sanctions on Russia.

In a statement, the Kremlin said the measures were intended to "protect Russia's security."

What is not clear is which food and agricultural imports will be banned. Instead, Putin asked his government to come up with a list of "products, raw materials and food" to include on the list in a way that prevents "the rapid growth of prices."

Many people in Sierra Leone still don't believe Ebola really exists.

In response, Ebola awareness announcements are now playing repeatedly on the radio and on loudspeakers up and down the streets of Freetown — Sierra Leone's pretty but ramshackle oceanfront capital. The announcements are part of awareness campaigns to try to stop the virus from spreading.

Just a few days ago, Code Switch wrote about the use violent hip-hop lyrics as evidence in criminal cases, a practice that some critics say violates defendants' First Amendment rights and plays up jurors' misunderstandings of the use of hyperbole in hip-hop.

Just as reports surfaced that Sprint, and its corporate parent SoftBank, were ending their bid to merge with T-Mobile, the company announced it was appointing a new CEO.

Sprint Chairman Masayoshi Son said Marcelo Claure, who runs Brightstar, a wireless company and subsidiary of SoftBank, would replace Dan Hesse, who has been Sprint's president and CEO since 2007.

In the announcement, Son made a passing reference to Sprint's decision to forgo the T-Mobile merger.

Can the U.S. government use social media to combat anti-social behavior? Can America win the online battle for the hearts and minds of potential terrorists?

Agriculture is a cornerstone of the Midwest economy. In some states, it may even become a right.

That's what unofficially happened in Missouri on Tuesday when voters approved the so-called "right to farm" in the form of an amendment to the state Constitution. (With less than a half of a percent vote differential, a recount is likely.) And the controversial provision could be a model for Constitutional additions in other big ag states.

Medicare spent more than $30 million in 2012 on questionable HIV medication costs, the inspector general of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said in an investigation published Wednesday.

The possible fraud schemes were all paid for by Medicare's prescription drug program known as Part D. Among the most egregious:

  • In Detroit, a 77-year-old woman purportedly filled $33,500 worth of prescriptions for 10 different HIV medications. But there's no record she had HIV or that she had visited the doctors who wrote the scripts.

Hawaii is preparing for two major storms this week, beginning with Hurricane Iselle, which is expected to weaken to a tropical storm by the time it arrives on Thursday. Hurricane Julio is expected to hit Saturday, again after weakening into a tropical storm.

Hawaii Public Radio's Bill Dorman tells our Newscast unit that residents and tourists are getting ready for the heavy rains, rough seas and 60 mph winds expected from the storms:

After nearly a month of brutal war, Gaza was calm for a second day on Wednesday.

And as that negotiated, three-day peace took hold, diplomacy stepped front and center.

In an interview with the BBC, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said both sides should take advantage of this moment to forge a longer-lasting peace.

Kerry said the U.S. supports Palestinians' desire to rebuild and open up borders, but that will happen only under a "bigger, broader approach to the underlying solution of two states."

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News and Features from APM and PRI

Rebalancing the S&P 500 means a whole lot of trades

2 hours ago

Friday was one of the four times a year when the S&P 500 rebalances itself. This means that some stocks leave this index and some come in. This also means that all the indixes and exchange-traded funds that track the S&P 500 (and there's many) have to also rebalance themselves to reflect the changes. S&P Dow Jones Indices, the parent company of the indicator, estimated this rebalancing would prompt $32 billion in required index trades.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Is the startup world OK with motherhood yet?

3 hours ago

Venture capital in this economy goes overwhelmingly to men, leaving would-be female entrepreneurs at a structural disadvantage. But women who want to start companies and families face even more obstacles when securing funding.

“Historically, women founders have been advised to not get pregnant if they're planning on fundraising, and if they are pregnant, to try to keep it on the down-low,” journalist Liza Boyd told Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal.

Lilly Singh and the changing face of late night

4 hours ago

Seventeen years after NBC hired Carson Daly to host its 1:30 a.m. late show, it's now turned to Canadian YouTube sensation Lilly Singh to replace him. We look at what that means. Plus, we'll explore a few contradictions: Solar is roaring back amid barriers from the Trump administration, and consumer confidence is up despite an economic downturn on the horizon.

CFPB chief presents agenda to Senate committee

4 hours ago

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s new director, Kathy Kraninger, is scheduled to appear before the Republican-run Senate Banking Committee this week to give a rundown of the agency’s policy agenda. It’s likely to be a different hearing from the one Kraninger faced earlier in the House, where Democrats grilled her about plans to roll back Obama-era protections against predatory payday lending.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Tesla unveils a new SUV, the Model Y

11 hours ago

At a launch party in Los Angeles last night, Tesla revealed what could be its most important vehicle yet. The Model Y is a small, all-electric SUV, that looks a lot like a taller version of the Model 3 sedan.

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