SC Public Radio

The Coronavirus and Cancer

Apr 9, 2020
Pixabay

Chemotherapy is a lot like a wildfire. It takes out everything in its way, including what’s beneficial. So, immune systems drop and lay a person’s entire self bare. It’s why the CDC recommends flu shots for chemotherapy patients every six months, as well as supplemental pneumococcal shots.

But that’s for influenza, which has vaccines ready and waiting for it every winter. COVID-19, of course, has no such thing, at least not yet. And it too is a bit like a wildfire in that it does not discriminate over who or what it touches.

For almost a month, students in South Carolina have received classroom instruction and completed assignments from the safety of their homes. In March, states across the country started closing schools to slow the spread of the Coronavirus. Since March 16, students in South Carolina have engaged in some form of e-learning, but experts say the lack of access to broadband in rural areas creates barriers for many.

U.S. Census Bureau

The Census. We've been doing it every 10 years since 1790 –  in part because it's in the Constitution and in part because it's really, really important to know how many of us there are and where we live.

That doesn't mean it's exactly easy to convince people to answer a bunch of personal questions. Jan Smiley, South Carolina partnership specialist with the U.S. Census Bureau, says Census takers often have to contend with citizens who are worried about what the bureau wants and what it's going to do with the information it collects.

The short answer, Smiley says, is nothing sinister.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Back in January, I sat down with Dr. Melissa Nolan, an epidemiologist at the University of South Carolina, in her lab at the Arnold School of Public Health in Columbia. We talked about how well the state could handle an outbreak of an infectious disease like influenza.

Pretty well, it turns out.

“Influenza is one that we’re probably the most prepared for,” Nolan said.

And that would have been the end of the conversation, had she, 34 seconds later, not said this: “What we’re not very well-prepared for, though, are vector-borne diseases.”

The U.S. Capitol is a grand achievement of classical architecture. A potential presidential order could make all federal building projects above a certain price be crafted in this same style. That doesn't sit well with several architects.
Heide Kaden/Unsplash

A potential Trump administration plan dubbed “Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again” would demand that all federal building projects costing above $50 million be designed in the neoclassical style. The aim is to unify the architectural style of major federal buildings.

But the initiative has drawn the ire of architects around the country.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Somewhere at the middle-end of the 19th century, a railroad tunnel under construction in Walhalla partially collapsed and left behind a cave that tricolor bats really took to. There used to be hundreds of the small, furry bats hibernating through the winters by clinging to the rock. By February 10 of this year, there were seven.

WalletHub

  

A new study from personal  finance and economics website WalletHub places South Carolina third overall in the level of engagement it sees from African-American voters, making the Palmetto State the most engaged among reliably red states.

While the study found that African-American voters were noticeably more engaged in states that went blue in the 2016 presidential election, black voter engagement here ranked higher than any traditionally blue state.

But it also ranks the state low on how easy it is for black voters to get to the polls at all.

ballot box
Tumisu via Pixabay

Note: This story has been amended to remove a reference to Michael Bloomberg setting up operations in South Carolina. Bloomberg is not on the South Carolina ballot.

Democrats are united on one idea. They want to unseat President Donald Trump. But past that, and even with the South Carolina Democratic Primary right around the corner, likely progressive voters are in a street fight between their ideals and who they think stands the best chance of accomplishing their main objective.

Coronavirus Scare You? Flu Should Scare You More

Feb 4, 2020
CDC

Health officials around the world are scrambling to stay ahead of the coronavirus outbreak plaguing parts of China. But Dr. Melissa Nolan, an infectious disease specialist at the University of South Carolina, says influenza is a far bigger cause for concern.

Hear more:

Holly Bounds-Jackson / South Carolina ETV

Manning Reentry/Work Release Center used to have another name. Until 2016, this nearly 60-year-old prison on the outskirts of Columbia was called Manning Correctional.

That might seem like a minor change. It’s not. It was the South Carolina Department of Corrections’ (SCDC) way of saying to the public and to Manning’s inmates that the perception, treatment, and, ultimately, rehabilitation of the men who do time there was going to change.

SCDEW

York County enjoys a unique position, geographically, in South Carolina. It borders a county (Mecklenburg) that houses a major U.S. city – Charlotte, N.C.

A Peek at South Carolina's New Voting Machines

Jan 14, 2020
Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

The Feb. 29 Democratic presidential primary will be South Carolina's first major test for its new voting machines. Last year, the state invested $51 million on new machines that election officials say are easier to use and more secure than what South Carolinians had been using for years.

A Few Tips for Safer Holidays

Dec 17, 2019
Unsplash, Public Domain

Everybody wants to believe in the kindness of the season this time of year, but it's still smart to keep a somewhat level head about the world. 

On the upside, taking a few precautions to keep your home from being too tempting to would-be crooks can actually make your holidays more enjoyable. 

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Gov. Henry McMaster and U.S. Rep. Ralph Norman (R-5th) were on hand Wednesday to dedicate Miracle Park in Rock Hill. The Miracle Park project is the first of its kind in the United States – an outdoor recreation center built specifically to accommodate visitors of all abilities.

Dubbed the most inclusive public project in the city’s history, Miracle Park will feature two softball/baseball fields, a fishing pond, and other recreational sites between Cherry Road and Eden Terrace.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

You did something when you were younger. Something kind of stupid that got you busted, way way back when you were a different person. And now you can't seem to find a decent place to live or a decent job because of an arrest –  not even a conviction! –  that's still stuck on your record.

The first thing a lot of people in this position think of is a pardon, says Jamie Bell, managing attorney for South Carolina Legal Services' office in Rock Hill. But pardons are hard to come by. A much safer bet is an expungement.

Pages