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The country life in South Carolina can be peaceful and quiet. Unless you're facing eviction.
Scott Morgan/SC Public Radio

Of the 100 most eviction-prone rural and small cities in the United States, 47 are in South Carolina. Thirty South Carolina rural/small cities are in the top 50.

Those numbers come from the Eviction Lab project at Princeton University, which compiled eviction filings and formal eviction records from 2000 to 2016.

Staying Safe in the South Carolina Sun

Jul 26, 2019
U.S. Air Force, Senior Airman Sandra Marrero

South Carolina ranked first in the United States for child vehicular heatstrokes in 2018, and with Palmetto State temperatures reaching highs of 100 degrees during the summertime, heat exhaustion is a serious, life-threatening danger, and residents should know the signs of danger.

Those who are especially vulnerable to the summer heat include young children, the elderly, and individuals who take anxiety and depression medication.

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of July 25, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes us to the recent South Carolina Democratic Party Convention to hear from presidential hopefuls former Maryland Congressman John Delaney, Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Miramar, FL Mayor Wayne Messam.

Gavin Jackson with Russ McKinney (l) and Andy Shain (r) in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, July 22, 2019.
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Post and Courier's Andy Shain and South Carolina Public Radio's Russ McKinney to discuss the recently-elected new president of the University of South Carolina, Robert Caslen.

USC president Robert Caslen during his first press conference Monday, July 22, 2019
Thelisha Eaddy/SC Public Radio

Strides in academic excellence, research and diversity are near-term goals of Robert ‘Bob’ Caslen, the University of South Carolina’s new president. Monday, the retired lieutenant general, who was elected into the role the previous Friday, held his first press conference at the University’s law school. But before talking about these goals and mastering future obstacles, the 29th president first took time to address comments from his recent past that stirred controversy around his candidacy and ultimate election.

The Physical and Mental Demands of Being in a Marching Band

Jul 22, 2019
Gabriel Sullivan performs at his first competition of the 2018 season.
Courtesy of Rhonda Rhodes

From band camp to the 14 hours of weekly practice, high schools across the state work constantly to prepare a show for football games and fall competitions. Between the practices leading up to their performances, bands across the state must do physical preparations in order to prepare for their upcoming seasons. Meredith Rhodes, drum major for the Lugoff-Elgin Marching Band, states that in order to prepare physically they “do a series of dancing warm-ups …  marching warm-ups to check technique, and weightlifting for the low brass instruments.”

Freetown mayor Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr (left to right with International African American Museum CEO Michael Boulware Moore
Victoria Hansen/SC Public Radio

Dressed in a brightly colored, patterned dress and wearing stylishly large, black rimmed glasses, 51 year-old Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr flashes the most fantastic smile. The mayor of Freetown, Seirra Leone in West Africa has travelled more than 4,000 miles to visit Charleston and South Carolina's Sea Islands. She must be exhausted. Yet she glows with warmth and enthusiasm.

"We're family," she tells an audience gathered inside the Frissell Community House at the Penn Center on Saint Helena Island. "We should be a bit closer than we have been to date."

Finding Young Farmers to Bear the Heat and Carry the Pitchfork

Jul 18, 2019
Tomatoes are a popular summer crop sold by numerous farmers at the State Farmers' Market
Lee Wardlaw/SC Public Radio

South Carolina's farming industry remains a stalwart economic engine. With approximately 25,000 farms over 4.9 million acres of land, the Palmetto State's agricultural community maintains its relevance in South Carolinians' day-to-day lives.

In a changing world, though, South Carolina's farming industry still continues to face the same old problems that it has for years.

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of July 18, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes us to the recent South Carolina Democratic Party Convention to hear from presidential hopefuls former Texas Congressman Beto O'Rourke, Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), and Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.).

Gavin Jackson (l) and Colin Demarest (r).
A.T. Shire/SC Public Radio

On this episode of South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Aiken Standard's Colin Demarest to discuss the recent special report "Lethal Legacy," written by Demarest and the Post and Courier's Thad Moore, detailing how South Carolina is expected to be home to tons of plutonium for decades, according to an internal memo obtained by the papers. The excess plutonium is housed in a 65-year-old building at the Savanah River Site which federal regulators have rated as poor.

Catawba Riverkeeper Brandon Jones, left, and Dr. Brett Hartis, manager of Duke Energy's Aquatic Plant Management Program, inspect a bloom of alligator weed on Lake Wylie.
Scott Morgan/SC Public Radio

South Carolina’s freshwater lakes and ponds are as vibrant as they come, full of pretty plants with pretty names like water primrose and water hyacinth. The only trouble is, these plants shouldn’t be here.

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of July 11, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes us to the recent South Carolina Democratic Party Convention to hear from presidential hopefuls Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Vice President Joe Biden, and New York City, NY Mayor Bill de Blasio. Over the next several Trail Bites episodes, we'll be brining you clips from all of the candidates who spoke at the convention.

S.C. Film Commission logo
S.C. Film Commission

The film industry provides much needed economic impact for South Carolina, netting $61 million in revenue for the state in 2018. The revenue is generated through the South Carolina Film Commission, which provides a $15 million dollar annual subsidy to filmmakers. The subsidy is funneled to the state's film commission through the state's government.

Career Online High School student Kindra Tucker and program associate Phillip Windsor
Thelisha Eaddy/ SC Public Radio

When Columbia resident Kindra Tucker, walked into the main branch of the Richland County Library, a sign caught her attention; its words would soon change her life.

“I was coming in to drop something off from work,” the Columbia Housing Authority employee said. “When I came up here, that’s when I saw the billboard up front.”

Charles M. Duke, Jr.
NASA

A half-century ago, as the world watched in awe as Neil Armstrong took that "one small step" into history on the surface of the moon, a voice from Houston was his constant connection to humanity back on Earth.  Earlier, however, as the landing craft neared its destination, that voice had called "60 seconds," to warn the Apollo 11 astronauts - Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins - that they had only one minute's worth of fuel to land, or they would have to abort the mission.  That voice belonged to future moonwalker Charles Duke of Lancaster, South Carolina.

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