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Mother Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

Felicia Sanders held her granddaughter so tight, she feared she might suffocate the child on the church floor, as a racist gunman they had welcomed to bible study executed nine fellow parishioners one by one.

Bullet casings scorched her legs.  She watched helplessly as her son Tywanza, just feet away in a pool of blood, took his final breath. 

Sanders and her granddaughter survived the massacred that claimed nine lives that night by playing dead.

Gavin Jackson (l) with Chris Trainor on Friday, January 17, 2020.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, as we celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this week, we look at the importance of the King Day at the Dome event in Columbia, SC. Host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Free Times' Chris Trainor, whose recent cover story on the event at the statehouse, now it is 20th year, traces history of the event from the protests around the Confederate battle flag to becoming a must-stop for Democratic presidential hopefuls.

Gavin Jackson (r) with Jeffrey Collins (l) and Avery Wilks.
Amiee Crouch/SCETV

On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, recorded live at Craft and Draft in Irmo, SC, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Associated Press' Jeffrey Collins and The State's Avery Wilks to preview this year's state legislative session.

Plus, South Carolina trivia, campaign trail updates, and more!

So called "fluff" made from plastics, paper and Styrofoam typically not recyclable but will be used as fuel
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

Imagine a world without recycling bins where what can be repurposed is; and discarded items that are typically left at landfills become fuel.  That's the world RePower South, a new recycling company, wants to build.

Carolyn Drake/WIRED

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, we revisit the tragic story of veterans who were the target of a catfishing scam orchestrated by prisoners using contraband cellphones. Host Gavin Jackson is joined by Wired's Vince Beiser to discuss his report on the scam which involved inmates from Lee Correctional Institution and led to the death of Greenville vet.

Gavin Jackson (l) with Jeffrey Collins and Andy Shain (r).
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

As 2020 kicks off, the South Carolina Lede continues its look back at the last 10 years. Host Gavin Jackson is once again joined by The Post and Courier's Andy Shain and The Associated Press' Jeffrey Collins to discuss more of the biggest South Carolina news stories from the past decade.

Gavin Jackson (l) with Jeffrey Collins and Andy Shain (r).
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Post and Courier's Andy Shain and The Associated Press' Jeffrey Collins to look at back the biggest South Carolina news stories from the past 10 years.

On this special edition of the South Carolina Lede, recorded in Washington, DC, on Friday, December 20, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove and McClatchy DC's Emma Dumain following the House of Representatives' vote to impeach President Donald Trump. They discuss how South Carolina members of the House voted, reactions from other Palmetto State lawmakers, what happens next, and more.

Bradley Fuller, South Carolina Public Radio

Late nights are a frustrating fact of life for many musicians. Too often, the time after sundown is all that remains for performing, practicing, working against an upcoming deadline, or agonizing over an artistic quandary.

But for composer Thomas Palmer, a senior studying composition and clarinet performance at the Unviersity of South Carolina School of Music, there’s inspiration to be found even in the drudgery of a sleep-deprived state. His reed quintet Red-Eye (2019), recently published by Murphy Music Press, is a musical representation of staying up late.

A Few Tips for Safer Holidays

Dec 17, 2019
Unsplash, Public Domain

Everybody wants to believe in the kindness of the season this time of year, but it's still smart to keep a somewhat level head about the world. 

On the upside, taking a few precautions to keep your home from being too tempting to would-be crooks can actually make your holidays more enjoyable. 

From left: Jamie Lovegrove, Maayan Schechter, Meg Kinnard, and SC Lede host Gavin Jackson.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

From the Democratic presidential primary race to Gov. Henry McMaster's first year of a full term, 2019 was another fascinating year of news is South Carolina. On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove, The State's Maayan Schechter, and The Associated Press' Meg Kinnard to discuss the top political stories of 2019 as the year comes to a close.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

You did something when you were younger. Something kind of stupid that got you busted, way way back when you were a different person. And now you can't seem to find a decent place to live or a decent job because of an arrest –  not even a conviction! –  that's still stuck on your record.

The first thing a lot of people in this position think of is a pardon, says Jamie Bell, managing attorney for South Carolina Legal Services' office in Rock Hill. But pardons are hard to come by. A much safer bet is an expungement.

Gavin Jackson (l) with Jamie Lovegrove and Mayaan Schechter (r) on Monday, December 9, 2019.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) ended her presidential bid last week citing financial concerns. On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The State's Mayaan Schechter and The Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove — who have covered Harris' stops in South Carolina since the beginning of her run — to look back on the campaign of the only black female candidate in the 2020 race.

Charleston Artist Honors Our Nation's Veterans

Dec 5, 2019
Mary Whyte painting of "Hank" a World War II Coast Guard Veteran from New Jersey
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

Charleston artist Mary Whyte secretly scoured the country painting portraits for seven years as part of her latest project, "We the People".  Her ambition is as extraordinary as her subjects; our nation's veterans.

"I really believe our truest Americans really are our veterans," says Whyte.

Known for her watercolor paintings depicting American life, Whyte became part journalist part historian for her latest venture.  She knew she wanted to depict a variety of veterans from each of the 50 states.  But she wasn't exactly sure where to find them.

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of December 4, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes us to a recent campaign stop by South Bend, IN Mayor Pete Buttigieg in Okatie, SC.

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