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Gavin Jackson (r) speaks with Jamie Lovegrove (l) and Maayan Schechter at Growler Haus in Spartanburg, SC, on Thursday, November 14.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, recorded live at Growler Haus in Spartanburg, SC, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove and The State's Maayan Schechter to discuss recent South Carolina political news. They look at Mark Sanford ending his 2020 presidential bid, South Carolina's $2 billion budget surplus, and former governor and United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley's new book.

Plus, South Carolina trivia, campaign trail updates, and more!

Listen to the latest afternoon headlines from South Carolina Public Radio:

Duke Energy wants South Carolina's Supreme Court to overturn a decision impacting how much it can charge its Palmetto State customers; SLED is being asked to help investigate attacks on horses in the Upstate; and a look ahead to Tuesday's runoff elections in several cities.

Charleston's first poet laureate Marcus Amaker
Marcus Amaker

Charleston's first poet laureate has been called a Renaissance man.  Marcus Amaker boasts many talents.  He's a poet, a musician, a videographer, as well as a graphics and web designer.

But perhaps it's not what he does; instead how he does it, that distinguishes him.

The 43 year-old takes the mic at the Free Verse Poetry Festival he conceived three years ago.  Applause fills the halls of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, mixed with the hypnotizing beat of drums. Behind the sticks is Quentin Baxter of the chart breaking group Ranky Tanky.

The Post and Courier

More than half of all Americans are living with at least one chronic condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, or cancer. On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with the Post and Courier's Tony Bartleme about one of the major factors contributing to those health issues: what we eat, and specifically how we cook that food. Bartleme recently spoke with researchers in South Carolina who continue to find evidence that substances called advanced glycation end products (AGEs), created by high heat cooking, are linked to the chronic disease epidemic in America.

Gavin Jackson (l) and Jamie Lovegrove in the South Carolina Public Radio studios on Monday, November 4, 2019.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

The US House of Representatives voted last week to formalize its impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by the Post and Courier's Jamie Lovegrove, fresh off a reporting trip to Washington, to discuss the latest on the inquiry.

 Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of October 31, 2019, we hear remarks from President Donald Trump from his speech at Benedict College, a historically black college, about criminal justice reform.

Scott Morgan / South Carolina Public Radio

Doug O'Neal spent 24 years in prison for the murder of a woman police still can't identify. But the evidence against him was so questionable that even the man who helped put him away says he's innocent.

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by Maayan Schechter, of The State newspaper, and Meg Kinnard, of the Associated Press, to talk about the criminal justice reform summit held at Benedict College that was attended by 10 Democratic candidates as well as President Donald Trump.

(Left to right) former State Rep. Lucille Whipper, IAAM Board Chair Wilbur Johnson, Burke student Syasia Coaxum, Congressman James Clyburn, former mayor Joe Riley, Congressman Joe Cunningham, Mayor John Tecklenburg and Freetown Mayor Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr
Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

It's the day former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley has been dreaming of for 20 years; the ground breaking of the new International African American Museum.  He says it all began with a book he read in 1998 called, "Slaves in the Family", written by Edward Ball.

"His book to me was as if a once hidden and locked vault was discovered and opened, " he told a crowd of hundreds Friday at Gadsden's Wharf.

"The secret, most vaulable treasure was long hidden and forbidden truth."

  Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of October 24, 2019, host Gavin Jackson speaks with Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) during her visit to Orangeburg, SC on October 18.

Gavin Jackson (l) and Maayan Schechter in the South Carolina Public Radio studios in Monday, October 21, 2019.
A.T. Shire/South Carolina Public Radio

On this episode of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson is joined by The State's Maayan Schechter to look at Sen. Elizabeth Warren's (D-Mass.) campaign approach to South Carolina and her popularity in the state which remains a stronghold for rival 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden.

Bradley Fuller / South Carolina Public Radio

Those who insist that speaking about music is akin to dancing about architecture would do well to take a few preliminary steps with Columbia-based conductor Nisan Ak. A native of Istanbul, Turkey, Ak knows that a little preparation before taking in a performance can go a long way.

On this edition of the South Carolina Lede, host Gavin Jackson speaks with South Carolina-based photojournalist Callie Shell about her new book, "Hope, Never Fear: A Personal Portrait of the Obamas." They discuss her years documenting the lives of Barack and Michelle Obama, her work covering seven presidential campaigns, and what goes into telling the news of the day visually.

Leading up to the 2020 election, South Carolina Lede is keeping you up to speed on what the candidates are saying on the campaign trail in the Palmetto State with these "Trail Bites" mini-episodes.

On this edition for the week of October 10, 2019, host Gavin Jackson takes us to the Charleston County Democratic Party's recent Blue Jamboree event to hear from Democratic presidential candidates Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif), and Tom Steyer. 

Sketch of woman FBI says Samuel Little has confessed to killing in  the Charleston area
FBI

The FBI calls him the most prolific serial killer in U.S history.  Now agents have released a sketch they say Samuel Little drew of a Charleston woman he claims to have killed and left near a military base. 

Authorities say Little, now 79 years-old, has confessed to killing 93 people, mostly women, in more than a dozen states between 1970 and 2005.  They believe his admissions are credible with local authorities  confirming as many as 50 cases.

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