Nature

Cedar Apple Rust

Sep 17, 2018
Cedar-Apple Rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae).
Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

This odd looking fungus grows on two, alternate hosts.

A Hatching Snake

Sep 14, 2018
Corn snake
Mike Wesemann via Wikimedia Commons

A listener happens upon a hatching Corn Snake.

A female two-striped walking stick mating with a male (top).
Mary Keim [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0] via Flickr

This insect can be found from North Carolina into Florida.

A "Dinosaur Lizard"

Sep 12, 2018
A Texas Horned Lizard
Paul Hurtado [CC BY-SA 2.0] via Flickr

This non-native lizard can now be found on beaches and barrier islands in South Carolina.

A Moth at the Window

Sep 11, 2018
An Imperial Moth
Lizmillea, [CC BY-SA 3.0] from Wikimedia Commons

A listener has a visit from an Imperial moth.

Caterpillars of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly
Galukalock, via Wikimedia Commons

These caterpillars love to eat plants in the fennel family.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clemson’s Home and Garden Information Center has a dandy fact sheet called Planning, p-l-a-n-n-i-n-g, a garden. You still have time to put out hardier winter vegetables like kale, collards, and turnips. Extension Agent Tony Melton and I have recorded podcasts about how to get a successful garden up and going and you can find those along with all sorts of other cool things to listen to.

Caterpillar of the Great Leopard Moth.
Bill Bumgarner [CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] via Flickr

A listener sees the caterpillar of a Great Leopard moth. That caterpillar will likely over-winter, forming its cocoon in the fall.

Battling Webworms

Sep 7, 2018
Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Back in the day, we took a long bamboo pole with us to the Christmas tree farm be sure a tree would reach our tall ceilings. If I were worried about the fall webworms in my pecan trees, perhaps I could use that pole to break up some of the lower nests.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Many people try to spray insecticides on the nests of eastern tent caterpillars or fall webworms. The webs, however, protect the caterpillars and usually the nests are too high to effectively reach with your sprayer. Trying to burn the nests may start a fire or badly damage the tree. One specialists says that if you can safely reach the nest, use the five-fingered, digital, integrated pest management approach.

Words on Nature

Sep 6, 2018
NatureNotes
SC Public Radio

Rudy quotes the writings of George McDonald and

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. The fall webworms are spectacularly visible these days. In spring, adults emerge from overwinter cocoons, females lay eggs and the first generation of this native caterpillar begins feeding in early summer.   They don’t cause much damage as by the time their populations build up towards the end of summer, the deciduous leaves they’re feeding on are ending their life cycle.

The "Brain Thing"

Sep 5, 2018
Aplidium stellatum (Verrill, 1871) - sea pork in Florida, USA.
James St. John [CC BY 2.0] via Flickr

A listener finds a "weird looking, 'brain thing'" on the beach...

Robber Fly (Triorla interrupta) preying on a Dragonfly (Plathemis lydia).
Thomas Shahan [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A listener is a witness to a fight between two predators.

Making It Grow Extra: More on Pines

Sep 4, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty and Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium continue their discussion on pine trees with more facts about the Slash Pine, the White Pine and the Shortleaf Pine.
(MIG Extra 11)

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. South Carolina has two noticeable web-building caterpillars, the Eastern tent caterpillar and the fall web worm.

Midland Water Snake, Lancaster, SC, 2004.
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

These snakes look a bit like Copperheads, but, are no venomous.

Dr. John Nelson, Amanda McNulty
Sean Flynn/SCETV

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about the Longleaf Pine, the Slash Pine and the Loblolly Pine.
(MIG Extra 10)

Making It Grow Extra: A Trip to Nebraska

Sep 2, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about his recent trip to botanize in Nebraska.
(MIG Extra 09)

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Feel free to bring flowering stems of goldenrod indoors – with insect-disseminated pollen it doesn’t cause allergies. It’s ragweed that makes copious amounts of nose-tickling pollen so light weight that winds blow it far and wide. Our most common ragweed is Ambrosia artesimifolia (no one seems to know why it’s called Ambrosia – the food of the Gods), and usually it tops out at a couple of feet.

Making It Grow Extra: Sunflowers

Sep 1, 2018

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore go in depth in the family of sunflowers.
(MIG Extra 08)

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Dr. John Nelson from the University of South Carolina AC Moore Herbarium about the importance of botany and taxonomy in today’s world.
(MIG Extra 07)

A Hickory Horned Devil caterpillar.
Bob Warrick [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

This menacing-looking Hickory Horned Devil caterpillar is actually harmless, and is the larval form of the Regal, or Royal Walnut moth.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow.  You might enjoy hearing some fun facts about goldenrod since it’s blooming everywhere now. Carolina’s AC Moore Herbarium lists over thirty different species of goldenrod, in the genus Solidago, collected here; some grow all over while others occur in only a few counties.

"Biggest Slugs"

Aug 30, 2018
Leopard slug
Nicholas Turland [CC BY-NC-ND 2.0] via Flickr

A listener spots two Limax maximus ("biggest slugs") mating. This species is sometimes called the Giant gardenslug, Great slug, Tiger slug, or the Spotted leopard slug.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. I found a kindred spirit while reading up on golden rod. Althea Fann wrote a charming article, “Reflections of an Accidental Florist,” you can find online. Printed in Crazyhorse, a College of Charleston publication, it’s available at the site Longreads.com.

Big Spiders

Aug 29, 2018
The Golden Silk, or, Banana spider is one of the large orb weavers you might see.
nikoreto [CC BY-SA 2.0] via Flickr

This time of year, spiders have grown prettty big; and the females you see are always larger than the males.

Making It Grow Minute
SC Public Radio

Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow. Clumps of goldenrod are brightening our roadsides and gardens. Garden club ladies don’t want watery eyes or runny noses, so you can bet they did their homework before encouraging our General Assembly to name goldenrod as the state wildflower. Plants with showy colorful flowers are usually trying to attract insect pollinators to carry their relatively heavy pollen from one flower to the next, and that’s exactly what happens with goldenrod.

Clemson Extension Agent and Host of Making It GrowAmanda McNulty talks with Clemson Agronomy Agent and SC Statewide Coordinator for the Industrial Hemp Program David DeWitt. They explain the challenges of growing, processing and marketing this new crop for South Carolina.

Mating Moths

Aug 28, 2018
Polyphemus Moth
Organic, via Wikimedia Commons

A listener spies some mating Polyphemus Moths.

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