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Education

Education

Find content about education in South Carolina.

  • What was the last time you wrote a letter or took notes in cursive? Some people haven't written in cursive since middle school and question its relevance in the classroom today.
  • The mental health of adolescents remains a serious and growing problem. In 2021, 42% of high school students reported feeling sad or hopeless, up from 26% in 2009.
  • The debate over homework and whether it improves academic success elicits many opinions.
  • The University of South Carolina will unveil a 12-foot bronze monument in 2024 that will honor the first three Black students to enroll at the university on Sept. 11, 1963.
  • For the last twenty years, school choice advocates have been pushing to enact a law that would allow parents to use state tax dollars to send their children to private or religious schools. Public school supporters have long resisted the idea claiming such a program would hurt public schools.This year the Republican controlled General Assembly appears to be on the verge of establishing a school-voucher program.
  • Several dozen school districts in the Upstate are pooling resources to recruit teachers.The new marketing campaign, called Teach at the Top, was in the works before the pandemic exacerbated teacher shortages statewide. Now, the districts say it's even more critical.The effort is a collaboration between the 23 Upstate school districts and three nonprofits. The hope is that they will be more successful working together than competing against each other.
  • A program in Charleston is trying to make the teaching profession more accessible to Black men, who are vastly underrepresented in classrooms in South Carolina and around the United States. Just 7% of America's public school teachers were Black during the 2017-18 school year although Black students make up 15% of the student population, according to the most recently available data from the National Center for Education Statistics. The program in Charleston, Men of CHS Teach, places new teachers in elementary classrooms even if they haven't participated in a student teacher program.
  • In the race for South Carolina education superintendent, questions about the Republican nominee's qualifications have arisen. That comes after lawmakers in 2018 passed a requirement that the position-holder have a master's degree. Ellen Weaver, the CEO of conservative think tank Palmetto Promise Institute and GOP nominee, currently lacks a master's degree. After winning the GOP primary Tuesday, Weaver told reporters she'll complete her master's degree in educational leadership in October. Kevin Hall, who has served as a legal counsel to the South Carolina Republican Party, emphasized that the candidate must possess a master's degree on inauguration day — not on election day.
  • The State House of Representatives this week voted overwhelmingly to replace and restructure the University of South Carolina’s governing board. The 113 to one vote follows a growing lack of confidence by many lawmakers in the current Board of Trustees. Those trustees are elected by the legislature, but botched presidential searches, million dollar payoffs to fired coaches, and public spats with some of the college’s largest donors led to the action on the bill.
  • South Carolina Democrats lined up more than 1,000 amendments in a symbolic attempt to delay a vote on a bill that would ban transgender students from playing girls' or women's sports in public schools and colleges. Between the four boxes of amendments and a tornado warning that evacuated the chamber, they stretched Tuesday's debate for nearly seven hours. But the Republican majority won, passing the bill on an 82-28 vote about 9:15 p.m. The legislation would require athletes to compete with the gender listed on their birth certificates. About a dozen states have already passed similar legislation. The bill needs one more routine approval before heading to the state Senate.